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Uniform Pricing Within and Across Regions: New Evidence from Argentina

Author

Listed:
  • Diego Daruich

    (New York University)

  • Julian Kozlowski

    (Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis)

Abstract

We compile a new database of grocery prices in Argentina with over 9 million observations per day. Our main novel finding is that products’ prices almost do not vary within stores of a chain (i.e., uniform pricing). We also find that prices do not change significantly with regional conditions or shocks, particularly so for chains that operate in many regions. To study the impact of uniform pricing on both consumers and firms, this paper uses a tractable model based on the trade literature. Motivated by our empirical findings, each firm has to set a unique price in both regions. Relative to a counterfactual in which firms can set different prices across regions (i.e., flexible pricing), uniform pricing reduces firm’s profits by 0.7%. Consumers, however, prefer uniform pricing and are willing to give up 3.8% of their income to avoid flexible pricing in the baseline model. The effect on consumers, however, depends on how much uniform pricing limits firms’ power to extract consumer surplus and how heterogeneous the regions are.

Suggested Citation

  • Diego Daruich & Julian Kozlowski, 2019. "Uniform Pricing Within and Across Regions: New Evidence from Argentina," 2019 Meeting Papers 669, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed019:669
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D40 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - General
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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