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Multidimensional Skills, Sorting, and Human Capital Accumulation

Author

Listed:
  • Fabien Postel-Vinay

    (UCL)

  • Jeremy Lise

    (UCL)

Abstract

We construct a structural model of on-the-job search in which workers differ in skills along several dimensions (cognitive, manual, interpersonal) and sort themselves into jobs with heterogeneous skill requirements along those same dimensions. We further allow for skills to be accumulated when used, and eroded away when not used. We estimate the model using occupation-level measures of skill requirements based on O*NET data, combined with a worker-level panel from the NLSY79. We use the estimated model to shed light on the origins and costs of mismatch along the cognitive, manual, and interpersonal skill dimensions. Our results clearly suggest that those three types of skills are very different productive attributes.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabien Postel-Vinay & Jeremy Lise, 2015. "Multidimensional Skills, Sorting, and Human Capital Accumulation," 2015 Meeting Papers 386, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:386
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    2. Fabien Postel-Vinay & Jean-Marc Robin, 2002. "Equilibrium Wage Dispersion with Worker and Employer Heterogeneity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(6), pages 2295-2350, November.
    3. Carl Sanders, 2012. "Skill Uncertainty, Skill Accumulation, and Occupational Choice," 2012 Meeting Papers 633, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Carl Sanders & Christopher Taber, 2012. "Life-Cycle Wage Growth and Heterogeneous Human Capital," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 399-425, July.
    5. Satoshi Tanaka & David Wiczer & Burhanettin Kuruscu & Fatih Guvenen, 2015. "Occupational Switching and Self-Discovery in the Labor Market," 2015 Meeting Papers 1181, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd Stinebrickner & Paul Sullivan, 2019. "Job Tasks, Time Allocation, and Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(2), pages 399-433.
    2. Stijepic Damir, 2020. "Job Mobility and Sorting: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 240(1), pages 19-49, February.
    3. Fatih Guvenen & Burhan Kuruscu & Satoshi Tanaka & David Wiczer, 2020. "Multidimensional Skill Mismatch," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 210-244, January.
    4. Rongsheng Tang & Yang Tang & Ping Wang, 2020. "Within-Job Wage Inequality: Performance Pay and Job Relatedness," NBER Working Papers 27390, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Esther Mirjam Girsberger & Miriam Rinawi & Matthias Krapf, 2018. "Wages and employment: The role of occupational skills," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0153, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    6. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd Stinebrickner & Paul Sullivan, 2019. "Beauty, Job Tasks, and Wages: A New Conclusion about Employer Taste-Based Discrimination," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 101(4), pages 602-615, October.
    7. Tang, Rongsheng & Wang, Gaowang, 2021. "Educational mismatch and earnings inequality," MPRA Paper 106953, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Radu Vranceanu & Angela Sutan, 2021. "Who should pay the bill for employee upskilling?," Working Papers hal-02977891, HAL.
    9. Fabien Postel-Vinay & Ilse Lindenlaub, 2017. "Multidimensional Sorting under Random Search," 2017 Meeting Papers 501, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. David J. Deming, 2021. "The Growing Importance of Decision-Making on the Job," NBER Working Papers 28733, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Tang, Rongsheng & Wang, Gaowang, 2021. "Educational mismatch and income inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 100(C).
    12. Gueyon Kim & Dohyeon Lee, 2020. "Offshoring and Segregation by Skill: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 2020-073, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    13. Magnac, Thierry & Roux, Sébastien, 2021. "Heterogeneity and wage inequalities over the life cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 134(C).
    14. Victoria Gregory, 2020. "Firms as Learning Environments: Implications for Earnings Dynamics and Job Search," Working Papers 2020-036, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 28 Jan 2021.
    15. Turrell, Arthur & Speigner, Bradley & Copple, David & Djumalieva, Jyldyz & Thurgood, James, 2021. "Is the UK’s productivity puzzle mostly driven by occupational mismatch? An analysis using big data on job vacancies," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    16. Slichter, David & Taveras, Elisa & Monge, Daniela, 2021. "The Skills of Rich and Poor Country Workers," MPRA Paper 106050, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Jeremy Lise, 2016. "The Research Agenda: Jeremy Lise on Heterogeneity and dynamics in the labor market and within the household," EconomicDynamics Newsletter, Review of Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(1), April.
    18. Maximiliano Dvorkin, 2017. "Skills, Occupations, and the Allocation of Talent over the Business Cycle," 2017 Meeting Papers 1527, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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