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Remittances for Economic Development: the Investment Perspective

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Abstract

Based on the economic theory of the family, this paper constructs a model of remittances where the migrant, besides sending money to his family, also invests in his home country. The investment is looked after by a family member in return for some monetary compensation. The model focuses on two different cases: statecontingent transfers (transfers are tied to investment outcomes) and fixed transfers (transfers are mainly of altruistic motive). As the migrant derives utilities from consumption, his consumption-investment decision is driven by preferences and future investment prospects. The transfers are to increase with both business encouraging and income compensatory effects.

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  • Thanh Le, "undated". "Remittances for Economic Development: the Investment Perspective," MRG Discussion Paper Series 4411, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uqmrg6:44
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    1. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Courage Mlambo & Forget Kapingura, 2020. "Remittances and Economic Development: Evidence from SADC Countries?," Eurasian Journal of Economics and Finance, Eurasian Publications, vol. 8(4), pages 261-273.
    2. Nahed Zghidi & Zouheir Abid, 2015. "Remittances, Economic Freedom, and Economic Growth in North African Countries," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 18(58), pages 139-162, December.
    3. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal & Mouhoud, El Mouhoub, 2016. "Education, male gender preference and migrants' remittances: Interactions in rural Morocco," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 324-331.
    4. Nuñez, Roy & Osorio-Caballero, María Isabel, 2021. "Remittances, migration and poverty. A study for Mexico and Central America," MPRA Paper 106018, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Abida Zouheir & Imen Mohamed Sghaier, 2014. "Remittances, Financial Development and Economic Growth: The Case of North African Countries," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 17(51), pages 137-170, March.
    6. Imen Mohamed Sghaier, 2021. "Remittances and Economic Growth in MENA Countries: The Role of Financial Development," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 1, pages 43-59, March.
    7. Rrezarta Gashi, 2018. "Remittance incomes and economic development in Kosovo," Prizren Social Science Journal, SHIKS, vol. 2(2), pages 43-51, December.
    8. Abdilahi Ali & Baris Alpaslan, 2013. "Do Migrant Remittances Complement Domestic Investment? New Evidence from Panel Cointegration," Economics Discussion Paper Series 1308, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    9. Abdilahi Ali & Baris Alpaslan, 2017. "Is There an Investment Motive Behind Remittances? Evidence From Panel Cointegration," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 51(1), pages 63-82, January-M.
    10. Nahed Zghidi & Imen Mohamed Sghaier & Zouheir Abida, 2018. "Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth in North African Countries," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(3), pages 804-821, September.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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