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China's capital account convertibility and financial stability

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Abstract

Capital account convertibility in China is on the rise. Some see the process as a means of circumventing domestic financial sector inefficiency while others view it as potentially exposing China to financial crises. In considering these different viewpoints, this paper attempts to quantify the impact that opening the capital account will have on the volume of China�s international capital flows. It is found that were China to fully open its capital account, gross non-FDI capital flows are predicted to rise by around 4.6 percent of GDP. While an increase of this magnitude would present a prudential challenge for China�s monetary authorities, it does not appear to be large enough to seriously call into question financial sector stability, either in China or abroad.

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  • James Laurenceson & Kam Ki Tang, "undated". "China's capital account convertibility and financial stability," EAERG Discussion Paper Series 0505, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uqeaer:05
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