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Structural Change, Intersectoral Linkages And Hollowing-Out in the Taiwanese Economy, 1976-1994

This paper analyses structural change in the Taiwanese economy over the period 1976-1994 using a series of input-output tables. Unlike other studies of structural change, this analysis investigates the evolving internal complexity of intersectoral interdependencies using Key Sector Analysis which gauges the strength of forward and backward linkages, and the recently developed method of Minimal Flow Analysis, which gauges the degree of connectivity of the system. This analysis indicates that there has been a "hollowing-out" of the Taiwanese economy as the density of intersectoral linkages has declined since the early 1980s, similar to what has been observed of the US and Japanese economies at a much later stage of their development.

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File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/abstract/327.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia in its series Discussion Papers Series with number 327.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:327
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Web page: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/Email:


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  1. Allan G. B. Fisher, 1939. "Production, Primary, Secondary And Tertiary," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 15(1), pages 24-38, 06.
  2. Wang, Chin-Lih & Sun, Juh-Luh & Chou, Tein-Chen, 1992. "Sources of economic growth and structural change : A revised approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 383-401, April.
  3. Cowling, Keith & Tomlinson, Philip R, 2000. "The Japanese Crisis--A Case of Strategic Failure?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages F358-81, June.
  4. Young, Alwyn, 1994. "Lessons from the East Asian NICS: A contrarian view," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 964-973, April.
  5. Susan E. Feinberg & Michael P. Keane, 2001. "U.S.-Canada Trade Liberalization And Mnc Production Location," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 118-132, February.
  6. West, G R, 1982. "Sensitivity and Key Sector Analysis in Input-Output Models," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(39), pages 365-78, December.
  7. Bernadette Andreosso-O'Callaghan & Guoqiang Yue, 2000. "An Analysis of Structural Change in China using Biproportional Methods," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 99-111.
  8. Syrquin, Moshe, 1988. "Patterns of structural change," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 7, pages 203-273 Elsevier.
  9. Michael Sonis & J. D. Hewings & Jiemin Guo, 2000. "A New Image of Classical Key Sector Analysis: Minimum Information Decomposition of the Leontief Inverse," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 401-423.
  10. Chow, Gregory & Lin, An-loh, 2002. "Accounting for Economic Growth in Taiwan and Mainland China: A Comparative Analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 507-530, September.
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