IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Employment of MNEs in Japan: New Evidence

  • Kozo Kiyota
  • Toshiyuki Matsuura

This paper asks two questions. 1) Do multinational enterprises (MNEs) present different patterns of employment from domestic firms? 2) Do workers in MNEs face a higher risk of losing jobs? We distinguish two types of MNEs (i.e., Japanese MNEs and foreign-owned firms) and utilize firm-level data in Japan between 1995 and 2000. It was true that the net job destruction of Japanese MNEs was larger than those of foreign-owned firms and domestic firms. However, this negative employment growth is attributable not to rapid job destruction but to slow job creation. Second, workers in Japanese MNEs and foreign-owned firms did not face a higher risk of losing jobs than did those in domestic firms. This finding contradicts the findings of Barba Navaretti, Turrini, and Checchi (2003) but is consistent with the firm-specific skill hypothesis of Fukao and Otaki (1993). Japanese MNEs and foreign-owned firms might invest heavily in job training, which results in their lower employment volatility.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/06e014.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI) in its series Discussion papers with number 06014.

as
in new window

Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:06014
Contact details of provider: Postal: 11th floor, Annex, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) 1-3-1, Kasumigaseki Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8901
Phone: +81-3-3501-1363
Fax: +81-3-3501-8577
Web page: http://www.rieti.go.jp/Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Slaughter, Matthew J., 2001. "International trade and labor-demand elasticities," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 27-56, June.
  2. Cowling, Keith & Tomlinson, Philip R, 2000. "The Japanese Crisis--A Case of Strategic Failure?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages F358-81, June.
  3. Susan E. Feinberg & Michael P. Keane, 2001. "U.S.-Canada Trade Liberalization And Mnc Production Location," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 118-132, February.
  4. R Blundell & Steven Bond, . "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data model," Economics Papers W14&104., Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  5. Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum & Francis Kramarz, 2004. "Dissecting Trade: Firms, Industries, and Export Destinations," NBER Working Papers 10344, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Boozer, Michael A., 1997. "Econometric Analysis of Panel Data Badi H. Baltagi Wiley, 1995," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(05), pages 747-754, October.
  7. Frank Barry, 2004. "Prospects for Ireland in an Enlarged EU," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(6), pages 829-852, 06.
  8. Dunne, Timothy & Roberts, Mark J & Samuelson, Larry, 1989. "Plant Turnover and Gross Employment Flows in the U.S. Manufacturing Sector," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(1), pages 48-71, January.
  9. Fukao, Kyoji & Otaki, Masayuki, 1993. "Accumulation of Human Capital and the Business Cycle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 73-99, February.
  10. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, June.
  11. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  12. Barba Navaretti, Giorgio & Checchi, Daniele & Turrini, Alessandro Antonio, 2003. "Adjusting Labour Demand: Multinational versus National Firms- A Cross-European Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 3751, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Revenga, Ana L, 1992. "Exporting Jobs? The Impact of Import Competition on Employment and Wages in U.S. Manufacturing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 255-84, February.
  14. Krishna, Pravin & Mitra, Devashish & Chinoy, Sajjid, 2001. "Trade liberalization and labor demand elasticities: evidence from Turkey," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 391-409, December.
  15. Eiichi Tomiura, 2001. "The Impact of Import Competition on Japanese Manufacturing Employment," Discussion Paper Series 120, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  16. Eiichi Tomiura, 2004. "Import Competition and Employment in Japan: Plant Startup, Shutdown and Product Changes," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 55(2), pages 141-152.
  17. Levinsohn, James, 1999. "Employment responses to international liberalization in Chile," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 321-344, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:06014. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (NUKATANI Sorahiko)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.