IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pri/indrel/504.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Mid-1990s EITC Expansion: Aggregate Labor Supply Effects and Economic Incidence

Author

Listed:
  • Jesse Rothstein

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

A key attraction of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is that it encourages work. But EITC-induced increases in labor supply may drive wages down, permitting employers of low-skill labor to capture some of the intended transfer and negatively impacting workers in the same labor markets who are ineligible for the credit. I exploit variation in tax treatment across family types and skill levels to identify the effect of a large EITC expansion in the mid 1990s on the female labor market, using a semiparametric reweighting strategy to decompose changes in the wage distribution into changes in skill-specific prices and quantities. The EITC expansion induced many low- and mid-skill single mothers to enter the labor force. Contemporaneous technical change led to increases in wages, but these were smaller than they would have been with a stable EITC. Ceteris paribus, low-skill single mothers keep only 70 cents of every dollar they receive through the EITC. Employers of low-skill labor capture 72 cents, 30 cents from single mothers plus 43 cents from ineligible (childless) workers whose after-tax incomes fall when the EITC is expanded. The net transfer to workers is less than a third of the amount spent on the program.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesse Rothstein, 2005. "The Mid-1990s EITC Expansion: Aggregate Labor Supply Effects and Economic Incidence," Working Papers 883, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:504
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dataspace.princeton.edu/jspui/bitstream/88435/dsp01f7623c587/1/504.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. DiNardo, John & Fortin, Nicole M & Lemieux, Thomas, 1996. "Labor Market Institutions and the Distribution of Wages, 1973-1992: A Semiparametric Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(5), pages 1001-1044, September.
    2. Alberto Abadie & Joshua Angrist & Guido Imbens, 2002. "Instrumental Variables Estimates of the Effect of Subsidized Training on the Quantiles of Trainee Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(1), pages 91-117, January.
    3. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    4. Nada Eissa & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 1996. "Labor Supply Response to the Earned Income Tax Credit," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 605-637.
    5. David Card & John E. DiNardo, 2002. "Skill-Biased Technological Change and Rising Wage Inequality: Some Problems and Puzzles," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(4), pages 733-783, October.
    6. Daniel Feenberg & Elisabeth Coutts, 1993. "An introduction to the TAXSIM model," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 189-194.
    7. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Abowd, John M & Card, David, 1989. "On the Covariance Structure of Earnings and Hours Changes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 411-445, March.
    9. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Salvador Ortigueira & Nawid Siassi, 2016. "Anti-poverty Income Transfers in the U.S.: A Framework for the Evaluation of Policy Reforms," Working Papers 2016-04, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    2. Nada Eissa & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2006. "Behavioral Responses to Taxes: Lessons from the EITC and Labor Supply," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 20, pages 73-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Raj Chetty & Emmanuel Saez, 2013. "Teaching the Tax Code: Earnings Responses to an Experiment with EITC Recipients," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, January.
    4. Claudio A Agostini & Marcela Perticara & Javiera Selman, 2014. "An Earned Income Tax Proposal for Chile," Working Papers wp_037, Adolfo Ibáñez University, School of Government.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tax incidence; labor supply; labor demand; EITC; Earned Income Tax Credit;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:504. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bobray Bordelon). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/irprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.