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Addenda to “Are the log-growth rates of city sizes distributed normally? Empirical evidence for the USA [Empir. Econ. (2017) 53:1109-1123]”

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  • Ramos, Arturo

Abstract

We update the recently published paper [A. Ramos, Empir. Econ. (2017) 53:1109-1123] on the basis of another important paper [H. S. Kwong and S. Nadarajah, Physica A (2019) 513:55-62]. Specifically, we introduce the 3-normal (3N) and 3-logistic (3L) distributions and compare them with the best of our distributions in the firstly mentioned paper, namely the "double mixture exponential Generalized Beta of the second kind (dmeGB2)". The main result is that the dmeGB2 remains to be the best model when studying log-growth rates of USA city populations to date. However, if one does not want to achieve such a high precision when describing the data, the 3L emerges to be a very good model for the same purposes.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramos, Arturo, 2019. "Addenda to “Are the log-growth rates of city sizes distributed normally? Empirical evidence for the USA [Empir. Econ. (2017) 53:1109-1123]”," MPRA Paper 93032, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:93032
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/93032/1/MPRA_paper_93032.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    log-growth rates; normal distribution; logistic distribution; GB2 distribution; USA population log-growth rates;

    JEL classification:

    • C46 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Specific Distributions
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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