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On The Absorbability Of Herd Behaviour And Informational Cascades: An Experimental Analysis

  • Morone, Andrea
  • Fiore, Annamaria
  • Sandri, Serena

A theory is said to be fully absorbable whenever its own acceptance by all of the individuals belonging to a certain population does not question its predictive validity. This accounts for strategic equilibria and can be related to the logic underlying convergence of behaviour and intentional herding in sequential games. This paper discusses the absorbability of informational cascades’ theory by bounded rational decision-makers and analyses whether providing individuals with theoretic information on informational cascades affects overall probability of herding phenomena to occur as well as whether an incorrect cascade can be reversed because of bounded rational adapting of the theory’s prescriptive.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/6884/1/MPRA_paper_6884.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 6884.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6884
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  1. Banerjee, Abhijit & Fudenberg, Drew, 2004. "Word-of-mouth learning," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-22, January.
  2. Marco Cipriani & Antonio Guarino, 2005. "Herd Behavior in a Laboratory Financial Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1427-1443, December.
  3. Daniel Sgroi, 2000. "The Right Choice at the Right Time: A Herding Experiment in Endogenous Time," Economics Series Working Papers 2000-W15, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Anderson, Lisa R & Holt, Charles A, 1997. "Information Cascades in the Laboratory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 847-62, December.
  5. Andrea Morone & Serena Sandri & Tobias Uske, 2007. "On the absorbability of the Guessing Game Theory. A Theoretical and Experimental Analysis," SERIES 0017, Dipartimento di Scienze economiche e metodi matematici - Università di Bari, revised Apr 2007.
  6. Angela Hung & Jeff Dominitz, 2004. "Homogeneous Actions and Hetergeneous Beliefs: Experimental Evidence on the Formation of Information Cascades," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 64, Econometric Society.
  7. Anderson, Lisa R, 2001. "Payoff Effects in Information Cascade Experiments," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(4), pages 609-15, October.
  8. Scharfstein, David. & Stein, Jeremy C., 1988. "Herd behavior and investment," Working papers WP 2062-88., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
  9. Sushil Bikhchandani & David Hirshleifer & Ivo Welch, 2010. "A theory of Fads, Fashion, Custom and cultural change as informational Cascades," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1193, David K. Levine.
  10. Becker, Gary S, 1991. "A Note on Restaurant Pricing and Other Examples of Social Influences on Price," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(5), pages 1109-16, October.
  11. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
  12. Steffen Huck & Joerg Oechssler, 1999. "Informational cascades in the laboratory: Do they occur for the right reasons?," Experimental 9901001, EconWPA.
  13. Markus Noth & Martin Weber, 2003. "Information Aggregation with Random Ordering: Cascades and Overconfidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(484), pages 166-189, January.
  14. Andrea Morone, 2008. "Financial markets in the laboratory: an experimental analysis of some stylized facts," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(5), pages 513-532.
  15. Louise Allsopp & John Hey, 2000. "Two Experiments to Test a Model of Herd Behaviour," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 121-136, October.
  16. John D. Hey & Andrea Morone, 2004. "Do Markets Drive Out Lemmings-or Vice Versa?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(284), pages 637-659, November.
  17. Morgenstern, Oskar, 1972. "Descriptive, Predictive and Normative Theory," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(4), pages 699-714.
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