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Monetary policy and informal finance: Is there a pecking order?

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  • Ghosh, Saibal
  • Kumar, Rakesh

Abstract

The paper utilizes state-level data on household dependence on informal finance for an extended time span to examine whether it is impacted by a monetary contraction. The analysis suggests a substitution effect such that borrowing from moneylenders declines, whereas landlords and relatives turn out to be the preferred financing choices. In addition, the evidence also supports a hierarchy among these preferred financing choices. This suggests that monetary policy needs to take on board its impact on the hitherto neglected informal sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghosh, Saibal & Kumar, Rakesh, 2014. "Monetary policy and informal finance: Is there a pecking order?," MPRA Paper 65243, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:65243
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/65243/1/MPRA_paper_65243.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Madestam, Andreas, 2014. "Informal finance: A theory of moneylenders," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 157-174.
    2. Carpenter, Seth B, 1999. "Informal Credit Markets and the Transmission of Monetary Policy: Evidence from South Korea," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 323-335, October.
    3. Rongili Biswas & Sugata Marjit & Velayoudom Marimoutou, 2010. "Fiscal Federalism, State Lobbying And Discretionary Finance: Evidence From India," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 68-91, March.
    4. Gupta, Manash Ranjan & Chaudhuri, Sarbajit, 1997. "Formal Credit, Corruption and the Informal Credit Market in Agriculture: A Theoretical Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(254), pages 331-343, May.
    5. Bell, Clive, 1990. "Interactions between Institutional and Informal Credit Agencies in Rural India," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 4(3), pages 297-327, September.
    6. Manojit Bhattacharjee & Meenakshi Rajeev, 2010. "Interest rate formation in informal credit markets in India: does level of development matter?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 12610, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    7. Pradhan, Narayan, 2013. "Persistence of Informal Credit in Rural India: Evidence from ‘All-India Debt and Investment Survey’ and Beyond," MPRA Paper 80381, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Bougheas, Spiros & Mizen, Paul & Yalcin, Cihan, 2006. "Access to external finance: Theory and evidence on the impact of monetary policy and firm-specific characteristics," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 199-227, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ghosh, Saibal & Vinod, D., 2017. "What Constrains Financial Inclusion for Women? Evidence from Indian Micro data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 60-81.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    informal finance; monetary policy; India;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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