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A Note on Shifts in Turkey's International Trade Pattern

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  • Deger, Cagacan

Abstract

It is frequently stated that Turkey's trade orientation has shifted in the last decade away from Europe and more towards the East, specifically Arab countries and Middle East. However, comprehensive presentation of the situation is lacking, causing concern over the validity of the statement. This paper examines the foreign trade of Turkey for years 1995 to 2012. The analysis focuses on a number of country groups and product categories. The analysis confirms the shift away from EU and towards not only Arab countries but Asia as a whole, primarily due to gas imports from Russia. It is observed that Turkey's exports are becoming more focused towards manufactured goods and increasing in technological complexity. An interesting observation is the increase in the share of “commodities and transactions not elsewhere classified”, especially with the Arab countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Deger, Cagacan, 2014. "A Note on Shifts in Turkey's International Trade Pattern," MPRA Paper 59817, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:59817
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/59817/1/makale-1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrew K. Rose, 2004. "Do We Really Know That the WTO Increases Trade?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 98-114, March.
    2. Bilin Neyaptı & Fatma Taskın & Murat Ungor, 2007. "Has European Customs Union Agreement really affected Turkey's trade?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(16), pages 2121-2132.
    3. Gordon H. Hanson, 2012. "The Rise of Middle Kingdoms: Emerging Economies in Global Trade," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 41-64, Spring.
    4. William Easterly & Ariell Reshef, 2014. "African Export Successes: Surprises, Stylized Facts, and Explanations," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 297-342 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Harry P. Bowen, 1997. "World Trade Flows, 1970-1992, with Production and Tariff Data," NBER Working Papers 5910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Mark N. Harris & László Kónya & László Mátyás, 2012. "Some Stylized Facts about International Trade Flows," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(4), pages 781-792, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    international trade; Turkey; trade patterns;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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