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Exploring the relation between urbanization and residential CO2 emissions in China: a PTR approach

  • Hu, Zongyi
  • Tang, Liwei
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    Recent empirical work suggests that urbanization and residential CO2 emissions are related. This paper investigates the nonlinear impact of urbanization on residential CO2 emissions over the period 1997–2011 in China by applying the Candelon et al. (2012) methodology. The results show that the relationship between urbanization and residential CO2 emissions is negative over the sample which is inconsistent with the previous studies. In addition, we find the absolute difference of the estimated coefficients in two regimes of urbanization is significant. Keywords: Panel threshold model, urbanization, residential CO2 emissions.

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    File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/55379/1/MPRA_paper_55379.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 55379.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:55379
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    1. Phetkeo Poumanyvong & Shinji Kaneko & Shobhakar Dhakal, 2012. "Impacts of urbanization on national residential energy use and CO2 emissions: Evidence from low-, middle- and high-income countries," IDEC DP2 Series 2-5, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
    2. Zhu, Hui-Ming & You, Wan-Hai & Zeng, Zhao-fa, 2012. "Urbanization and CO2 emissions: A semi-parametric panel data analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 848-850.
    3. Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada & Maruotti, Antonello, 2011. "The impact of urbanization on CO2 emissions: Evidence from developing countries," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(7), pages 1344-1353, May.
    4. Donglan, Zha & Dequn, Zhou & Peng, Zhou, 2010. "Driving forces of residential CO2 emissions in urban and rural China: An index decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3377-3383, July.
    5. Jing-Li Fan & Hua Liao & Qiao-Mei Liang & Hirokazu Tatano & Chun-Feng Liu & Yi-Ming Wei, 2011. "Residential carbon emission evolutions in urban-rural divided China: An end-use and behavior analysis," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 16, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.
    6. Bruce E. Hansen, 1997. "Threshold effects in non-dynamic panels: Estimation, testing and inference," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 365, Boston College Department of Economics.
    7. Bertrand Candelon & Gilbert Colletaz & Christophe Hurlin, 2013. "Network Effects and Infrastructure Productivity in Developing Countries," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(6), pages 887-913, December.
    8. Zhu, Qin & Peng, Xizhe & Wu, Kaiya, 2012. "Calculation and decomposition of indirect carbon emissions from residential consumption in China based on the input–output model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 618-626.
    9. York, Richard & Rosa, Eugene A. & Dietz, Thomas, 2003. "STIRPAT, IPAT and ImPACT: analytic tools for unpacking the driving forces of environmental impacts," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 351-365, October.
    10. Al-mulali, Usama & Fereidouni, Hassan Gholipour & Lee, Janice Y.M. & Sab, Che Normee Binti Che, 2013. "Exploring the relationship between urbanization, energy consumption, and CO2 emission in MENA countries," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 107-112.
    11. Liu, Wenling & Wang, Can & Mol, Arthur P.J., 2012. "Rural residential CO2 emissions in China: Where is the major mitigation potential?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 223-232.
    12. Matthew A. Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Examining the Impact of Demographic Factors On Air Pollution," Labor and Demography 0312005, EconWPA, revised 13 May 2004.
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