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Weather and stock markets: empirical evidence from Portugal

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  • Silva, Pedro
  • Almeida, Liliana

Abstract

Multiple psychological studies support a relationship between weather and the mood of individuals. Furthermore, mood seems to influence the decision making process of individuals namely when those decisions are risky. Therefore, weather may have an indirect impact on market returns. We review the current evidence and investigate the relationship between four weather variables (Rain, Temperature, Sunshine and Wind speed) and the returns of a Portuguese stock market index between January 2000 and December 2009. In this research, based on “bin tests” and regression analysis, we detect the influence of temperature, especially, low temperatures, on the stock market (low temperatures being associated with higher returns) but we cannot rule out the possibility that weather effects are being confounded with simpler calendar patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Silva, Pedro & Almeida, Liliana, 2011. "Weather and stock markets: empirical evidence from Portugal," MPRA Paper 54119, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:54119
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/54119/1/MPRA_paper_54119.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Hui-Chu Shu & Mao-Wei Hung, 2009. "Effect of wind on stock market returns: evidence from European markets," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(11), pages 893-904.
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    5. Chang, Shao-Chi & Chen, Sheng-Syan & Chou, Robin K. & Lin, Yueh-Hsiang, 2008. "Weather and intraday patterns in stock returns and trading activity," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1754-1766, September.
    6. Dowling, Michael & Lucey, Brian M., 2008. "Robust global mood influences in equity pricing," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 145-164, April.
    7. Chang, Tsangyao & Nieh, Chien-Chung & Yang, Ming Jing & Yang, Tse-Yu, 2006. "Are stock market returns related to the weather effects? Empirical evidence from Taiwan," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 364(C), pages 343-354.
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    12. Dowling, Michael & Lucey, Brian M., 2005. "Weather, biorhythms, beliefs and stock returns--Some preliminary Irish evidence," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 337-355.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stock market anomalies; Weather effects; Stock returns; Market efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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