IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Size of the Government, Quality of Institutions and Growth in SAARC Countries

  • anwar, saba
  • munir, kashif

One elusive question still attracts the attention of the researchers and policy makers whether government has a positive or negative role in the growth of a country. Washington consensus depressed the role of the government as an anchor of growth, while the post Washington consensus again focuses on the role of the government as the major player to revive growth. Theoretically, the linkages have been well established between the government spending and growth. However, the extensive use of cross country growth regressions in 1980s and 1990s highlighted the controversies in the empirical testing of these schools of thought using data for different countries and different techniques to prove their hypothesis. Most of these studies concentrated on the developed countries, while few try to explore the structure in developing countries. The question still remains, whether public sector promotes or retards growth.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/49524/1/MPRA_paper_49524.pdf
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 49524.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 30 Aug 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:49524
Contact details of provider: Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Philip J. Grossman, 1988. "Government and Economic Growth: A Non-Linear Relationship," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-04, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 2003. "Tropics, germs, and crops: how endowments influence economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 3-39, January.
  3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker Than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116, February.
  4. Acemoglu, Daron & Johnson, Simon & Robinson, James & Thaicharoen, Yunyong, 2003. "Institutional causes, macroeconomic symptoms: volatility, crises and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 49-123, January.
  5. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2002. "Reversal Of Fortune: Geography And Institutions In The Making Of The Modern World Income Distribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1231-1294, November.
  6. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
  7. Arthur Grimes, 2003. "Economic Growth and the Size and Structure of Government: Implications for New Zealand," Working Papers 03_10, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  8. Edmund J. Sheehey, 1993. "The Effect of Government Size on Economic Growth," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 19(3), pages 321-328, Summer.
  9. Ram, Rati, 1986. "Government Size and Economic Growth: A New Framework and Some Evidencefrom Cross-Section and Time-Series Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 191-203, March.
  10. Rodrik, Dani & Subramanian, Arvind & Trebbi, Francesco, 2002. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 3643, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. Sheng-Tung Chen & Chi-Chung Chen & Yoonbai Kim, 2011. "Economic Growth and Government Size in OECD Countries: New Evidence from the Quantile Regression Approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 416-425.
  12. M Arellano & O Bover, 1990. "Another Look at the Instrumental Variable Estimation of Error-Components Models," CEP Discussion Papers dp0007, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  13. Dowrick, Steve, 1996. "Estimating the Impact of Government Consumption on Growth: Growth Accounting and Endogenous Growth Models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 163-86.
  14. Arief Ramayandi, 2003. "Economic Growth And Government Size In Indonesia: Some Lessons For The Local Authorities," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 200302, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Jul 2003.
  15. C. Colombier, 2009. "Growth effects of fiscal policies: an application of robust modified M-estimator," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(7), pages 899-912.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:49524. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.