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The Impact of the Microchip on the Card Frauds

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  • Ardizzi, Guerino

Abstract

The issue of frauds through payment cards has received a great deal of attention from authorities. A large share of card frauds can be ascribed to the phenomenon of counterfeiting of debit cards, widely used payment instrument in “face-to-face” transactions. With the advent of the Single Euro Payment Area, the European banking community has shared and almost reached the ambitious goal of replacing all the cards (and accepting terminals) with chip compatible ones, which are supposed to be harder to clone than the magnetic stripe card. Using a bi-annual balanced panel data of over one hundred Italian banks, in this paper we estimate for the first time the real impact on card frauds caused by the chip card migration. The results confirm the positive effects of the new technology: the ratio between fraud and ATM-POS transactions (card fraud loss rate) is reduced significantly if the chip card is present.

Suggested Citation

  • Ardizzi, Guerino, 2012. "The Impact of the Microchip on the Card Frauds," MPRA Paper 41435, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41435
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anneke Kosse, 2013. "The Safety of Cash and Debit Cards: A Study on the Perception and Behavior of Dutch Consumers," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(4), pages 77-98, December.
    2. Koenker, Roger, 2004. "Quantile regression for longitudinal data," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 74-89, October.
    3. Guerino Ardizzi & Eleonora Iachini, 2013. "Why are payment habits so heterogeneous across and within countries? Evidence from European countries and Italian regions," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 144, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Kosse, Anneke, 2013. "Do newspaper articles on card fraud affect debit card usage?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5382-5391.
    5. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2005. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521848053, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joanna Stavins, 2013. "Security of retail payments: the new strategic objective," Public Policy Discussion Paper 13-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Guerino Ardizzi & Elisa Bonifacio & Laura Painelli, 2020. "Payment card fraud: global trends and empirical evidence on Internet card fraud in Italy," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 562, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Vania Silva & Esmeralda Ramalho & Carlos Vieira, 2016. "Is EMV adoption changing card payments? Evidence from the European Union," CEFAGE-UE Working Papers 2016_05, University of Evora, CEFAGE-UE (Portugal).
    4. Leo Van Hove & Farhod P. Karimov, 2016. "The role of risk in e-retailers’ adoption of payment methods: evidence for transition economies," Electronic Commerce Research, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 27-72, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fraud; debit card; payment instrument; security; chip; technology; prevention; EMV; SEPA;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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