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Proximate illiteracy and modern contraceptive use in India: Analysis of DHS data

Author

Listed:
  • Husain, Zakir
  • Dutta, Mousumi

Abstract

This paper examines the hypothesis that contraceptive use of illiterate women having literate partners (proximate literates), may be higher than that of illiterate women whose partners too are illiterates (isolate illiterates) using Demographic Health Survey data for India (2005-2006). Results reveal that the proximate illiteracy effect is significant, though restricted to specific groups; it varies according to contraceptive method; increasing the partner’s education level does not increase strength of the externality effect; literacy of other female household members does not matter; and accounting for self selection into marriage increases strength of externality effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Husain, Zakir & Dutta, Mousumi, 2012. "Proximate illiteracy and modern contraceptive use in India: Analysis of DHS data," MPRA Paper 39951, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39951
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39951/1/MPRA_paper_39951.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Vegard Iversen & Richard Palmer-Jones, 2008. "Literacy Sharing, Assortative Mating, or What? Labour Market Advantages and Proximate Illiteracy Revisited," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(6), pages 797-838.
    2. Srijit Mishra, 2005. "Secluded and Proximate Illiteracy: Comparing Situations," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 70(2), pages 231-240, January.
    3. Basu, Kaushik & Foster, James E, 1998. "On Measuring Literacy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(451), pages 1733-1749, November.
    4. Gibson, John, 2001. "Literacy and Intrahousehold Externalities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 155-166, January.
    5. Basu, Kaushik & Narayan, Ambar & Ravallion, Martin, 2001. "Is literacy shared within households? Theory and evidence for Bangladesh," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(6), pages 649-665, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Contraceptive use; proximate illiteracy; sterilization; India;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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