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Long-run macroeconomic impact of international migrant remittances on human development in low-income countries: A panel analysis of sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Adenutsi, Deodat E.

Abstract

In order to provide an empirical insight into the role of international migrant remittance inflows in low-income countries, this paper examines at the macro level, the long-run impact of international migrant remittance inflows on overall human development in Sub-Saharan Africa which has been well-known as a perennial net exporter of labour to the industrialized world since the colonial era. The fixed-effects balanced annual panel data estimation procedure for the period, 1987 to 2007, on 18 Sub-Saharan African countries was used for the empirical analysis. The paper finds that, contrary to the apprehension of the remittance-pessimistic developmental school, international migrant remittance inflows have a significant positive long-run impact on overall human development in low-income Sub-Saharan African countries. This evidence suggests that the essential role of international migrant remittance inflows on the socioeconomic development of Sub-Saharan Africa should not be undervalued in formulating any contemporary economic development strategy for the sub-region. It is, therefore, recommended that governments of the sub-region should pursue remittance-attracting policy as one of the macroeconomic policies to stimulate human development in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Adenutsi, Deodat E., 2009. "Long-run macroeconomic impact of international migrant remittances on human development in low-income countries: A panel analysis of sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 37115, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37115
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/37115/1/MPRA_paper_37115.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adams, Richard H. Jr., 2006. "Remittances and poverty in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3838, The World Bank.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, January.
    3. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    4. Bichaka Fayissa & Christian Nsiah, 2010. "The Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth and Development in Africa," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 55(2), pages 92-103, November.
    5. Adams, Richard H., Jr., 1991. "The effects of international remittances on poverty, inequality, and development in rural Egypt:," Research reports 86, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adenutsi, Deodat E., 2011. "Do remittances alleviate poverty and income inequality in poor countries? Empirical evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 37130, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:pid:journl:v:55:y:2016:i:2:p:123-149 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Migrant Remittances; Human Development; Fixed-Effects Panel Data Analysis; Sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances

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