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Going green: does it depend on education, gender, or income?

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  • De Silva, Dakshina
  • Pownall, Rachel A. J.

Abstract

Sustainable development entails meeting our present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This requires us to treat economic, social and environmental aspects in an integrated way, but little is known about the nature of individual preferences towards the trade-offs involved in this effort. For the first time, we study individual preferences towards the environment, social wellbeing, and financial wellbeing using a survey of over 1400 households in the Netherlands. Using nonparametric, parametric, and matching methods, we find that gender and education are important factors for sustainability rather than income levels. Moreover results indicate that educated females put the greatest value on going green whilst being socially minded.

Suggested Citation

  • De Silva, Dakshina & Pownall, Rachel A. J., 2012. "Going green: does it depend on education, gender, or income?," MPRA Paper 36465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:36465
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:4:p:997-:d:138467 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Horbach, Jens & Jacob, Jojo, 2017. "The relevance of personal characteristics and gender diversity for (eco)-innovation activities at the firm-level : Results from a linked employer-employee database in Germany," IAB Discussion Paper 201711, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    3. Justyna Przychodzen & Fernando Gómez-Bezares & Wojciech Przychodzen & Mikel Larreina, 2016. "ESG Issues among Fund Managers—Factors and Motives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-19, October.
    4. Meyer, Andrew, 2016. "Is unemployment good for the environment?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 18-30.
    5. Meyer, Andrew, 2015. "Does education increase pro-environmental behavior? Evidence from Europe," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 108-121.
    6. Yujie Li, Xiaoyi Mu,Anita Schiller, and Baowei Zheng, 2016. "Willingness to Pay for Climate Change Mitigation: Evidence from China," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(China Spe).
    7. Zhang, Li & Sun, Cong & Liu, Hongyu & Zheng, Siqi, 2016. "The role of public information in increasing homebuyers' willingness-to-pay for green housing: Evidence from Beijing," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 40-49.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sustainability; financial wellbeing; heterogenous preferences;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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