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Where NGOs go and do not go?

Author

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  • Mallick, Debdulal
  • Nabin, Munirul

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the role of output market imperfections in constraining the microfinance program to mitigate credit market imperfections. We develop a model in which output market imperfections increase operating costs for NGOs and create barriers for producers to market their goods. Therefore, NGOs engage in locations having good physical infrastructure and better productive and marketing opportunities to minimize operating cost and maximize loan repayment. Using data from northern Bangladesh, we find strong support for the model predictions. NGO coverage in a village, measured both by percentage of NGO member households and number of NGOs working, decreases with distance of the village from marketplace and increases with adoption of modern irrigation method and soil quality. NGOs do not consider poverty incidence in the village. The results have important implications for development economics in general and impact assessment of microfinance program in particular.

Suggested Citation

  • Mallick, Debdulal & Nabin, Munirul, 2010. "Where NGOs go and do not go?," MPRA Paper 27185, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27185
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aubert, Cécile & de Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2009. "Designing credit agent incentives to prevent mission drift in pro-poor microfinance institutions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 153-162, September.
    2. Gutiérrez-Nieto, Begoña & Serrano-Cinca, Carlos & Mar Molinero, Cecilio, 2007. "Microfinance institutions and efficiency," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 131-142, April.
    3. Jain, Sanjay & Mansuri, Ghazala, 2003. "A little at a time: the use of regularly scheduled repayments in microfinance programs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 253-279, October.
    4. Amin, Sajeda & Rai, Ashok S. & Topa, Giorgio, 2003. "Does microcredit reach the poor and vulnerable? Evidence from northern Bangladesh," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 59-82.
    5. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    6. Ahlin, Christian & Lin, Jocelyn & Maio, Michael, 2011. "Where does microfinance flourish? Microfinance institution performance in macroeconomic context," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 105-120, July.
    7. Anna Fruttero & Varun Gauri, 2005. "The Strategic Choices of NGOs: Location Decisions in Rural Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 759-787.
    8. Emran, M. Shahe & Morshed, A.K.M Mahbub & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2011. "Microfinance and Missing Markets," MPRA Paper 41451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Mallick, Debdulal, 2012. "Microfinance and Moneylender Interest Rate: Evidence from Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1181-1189.
    10. Mersland, Roy & Strøm, R. Øystein, 2010. "Microfinance Mission Drift?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 28-36, January.
    11. McIntosh, Craig & Wydick, Bruce, 2005. "Competition and microfinance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 271-298, December.
    12. Copestake, James, 2007. "Mainstreaming Microfinance: Social Performance Management or Mission Drift?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1721-1738, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Berg, Claudia & Emran, M. Shahe & Shilpi, Forhad, 2013. "Microfinance and moneylenders : long-run effects of MFIs on informal credit market in Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6619, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Microfinance; location choice; NGO; market imperfections; poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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