IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Relationship between consumer price index (CPI) and KSE-100 index trading volume in pakistan and finding the endogeneity in the involved data

  • Subhani, Muhammad Imtiaz
  • Osman, Amber
  • Gul, Ameet

This study examined monthly KSE-100 index trading volume response to announcements about Consumer price index (CPI) in the period of January 2004 to august 2009. Regression results supported the hypothesis that change in CPI has significant association with the change in KSE 100 index trading volume and regression was statistically significant and has shown that there is a negative relationship between CPI “Consumer price index” and KSE-100 index trading volume. More over the Presence of endogeneity has also been discussed via applying heckman's correction in the data.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

File URL:
File Function: revised version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 26375.

in new window

Date of creation: 01 Nov 2010
Date of revision: 02 Nov 2010
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26375
Contact details of provider: Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Ray C. Fair, 2000. "Events that Shook the Market," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm149, Yale School of Management.
  2. Michael Smirlock, 1986. "Inflation announcements and financial market reaction: evidence from the long-term bond market," Working Papers 86-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  3. Schwert, G William, 1989. " Why Does Stock Market Volatility Change over Time?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(5), pages 1115-53, December.
  4. Greg Adams & Grant McQueen & Robert Wood, 2004. "The Effects of Inflation News on High Frequency Stock Returns," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(3), pages 547-574, July.
  5. Kandel, Shmuel & Ofer, Aharon R & Sarig, Oded, 1993. "Learning from Trading," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 507-26.
  6. Castanias, Richard P, II, 1979. "Macroinformation and the Variability of Stock Market Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 34(2), pages 439-50, May.
  7. Douglas K. Pearce & V. Vance Roley, 1984. "Stock Prices and Economic News," NBER Working Papers 1296, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Jain, Prem C, 1988. "Response of Hourly Stock Prices and Trading Volume to Economic News," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(2), pages 219-31, April.
  9. Mitchell, Mark L & Mulherin, J Harold, 1994. " The Impact of Public Information on the Stock Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(3), pages 923-50, July.
  10. Huberman, Gur & Schwert, G William, 1985. "Information Aggregation, Inflation, and the Pricing of Indexed Bonds," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(1), pages 92-114, February.
  11. Chen, Nai-Fu & Roll, Richard & Ross, Stephen A, 1986. "Economic Forces and the Stock Market," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(3), pages 383-403, July.
  12. Schwert, G William, 1981. "The Adjustment of Stock Prices to Information about Inflation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 36(1), pages 15-29, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26375. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.