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PAYG pensions, tax-cum-subsidy and optimality

  • Fanti, Luciano
  • Gori, Luca

Using a simple OLG small open economy with endogenous fertility we show that the command optimum can be decentralised in a market setting using both a PAYG transfer from the young (old) to the old (young) and a tax-cum-subsidy (subsidy-cum-tax) policy, to redistribute within the working age generation. The latter instrument, in fact, reduces (increases) the opportunity cost of bearing children and, hence, stimulates (depresses) fertility. The policy implications are straightforward: when PAYG transfers exist and child rearing is time consuming, a tax-cum-subsidy (subsidy-cum-tax) policy can be used to internalise the externality of children, while also representing a Pareto improvement.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/20219/1/MPRA_paper_20219.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 20219.

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Date of creation: 23 Jan 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:20219
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  1. Klaus Jaeger & Wolfgang Kuhle, 2009. "The optimum growth rate for population reconsidered," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 23-41, January.
  2. Deardorff, Alan V, 1976. "The Optimum Growth Rate for Population: Comment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 17(2), pages 510-15, June.
  3. Fenge, Robert & Meier, Volker, 2005. "Pensions and Fertility Incentives," Munich Reprints in Economics 20343, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  4. Galor, Oded & Weil, David N, 1996. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 374-87, June.
  5. Samuelson, Paul A, 1975. "The Optimum Growth Rate for Population," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 16(3), pages 531-38, October.
  6. Gahvari, Firouz, 1993. "Taxation and Government Expenditures in a Life-Cycle Growth Model," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 48(1), pages 33-56.
  7. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467.
  8. Edmund S. Phelps, 1968. "Population Increase," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 1(3), pages 497-518, August.
  9. Eckstein, Zvi & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1985. "Endogenous fertility and optimal population size," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 93-106, June.
  10. Luca Gori & Luciano Fanti, 2007. "Welfare and Fertility in a Neoclassical Olg Growth Model: The Effects of Intra-Generational Tax Policies," STUDI ECONOMICI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2007(93), pages 53-69.
  11. Bas Groezen & Lex Meijdam, 2008. "Growing old and staying young: population policy in an ageing closed economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 573-588, July.
  12. van Groezen, Bas & Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex, 2003. "Social security and endogenous fertility: pensions and child allowances as siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 233-251, February.
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