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Artistic creation and intellectual property

Author

Listed:
  • Alcala, Francisco
  • Gonzalez-Maestre, Miguel

Abstract

We analyze artistic markets considering three key distinctive features that have been overlooked by the standard analysis on intellectual property. These features are the dynamic link between the current number of young artists and future high-quality artistic creation, Rosen's superstars phenomenon, and the role played by promotion costs. Introducing them into an overlapping-generations model brings about a new perspective on the consequences for artistic creation of changes in the copyright term, progress in communication technologies favoring market concentration by stars, and the enlargement of markets. The conventional result that longer copyrights always stimulate artistic creation only holds as a particular case.

Suggested Citation

  • Alcala, Francisco & Gonzalez-Maestre, Miguel, 2005. "Artistic creation and intellectual property," MPRA Paper 1287, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Dec 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1287
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    superstars; copyright; innate abilities; talent;

    JEL classification:

    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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