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Fiscal rules in a highly distorted economy

  • Marattin, Luigi
  • Marzo, Massimiliano

The objective of this paper is to investigate the optimality of EMU fiscal rules from a welfare perspective. We compute welfare-maximizing feedback coefficients for monetary and fiscal rules in a NK-DSGE with a high number of nominal and real distortions, calibrated on the Euro-area data. The framework includes imperfect competition, costly capital accumulation, consumption habits, price and wage stickiness, distortionary taxation on consumption, labor and capital income. Fiscal policy responds, alternatively, to total deficit, total government liabilities, and a linear combination of both targets. We show that the liabilities rule is welfare superior, but it does not provide enough output stabilization if not coupled with a non-zero response of monetary policy to output; optimal feedback coefficient are larger under debt targeting rather than deficit; under the current specification, a SGP-like rule seems highly suboptimal.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 11039.

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Date of creation: 09 Oct 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11039
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  1. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2004. "Optimal Simple and Implementable Monetary and Fiscal Rules," NBER Working Papers 10253, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jinill Kim and Sunghyun Henry Kim, 2001. "Spurious Welfare Reversals in International Business Cycle Models," Computing in Economics and Finance 2001 3, Society for Computational Economics.
  3. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2006. "Optimal Simple and Implementable Monetary and Fiscal Rules: Expanded Version," NBER Working Papers 12402, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Collard, Fabrice & Dellas, Harris, 2005. "Tax distortions and the case for price stability," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 249-273, January.
  5. V. V Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 2002. "Can Sticky Price Models Generate Volatile and Persistent Real Exchange Rates?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(3), pages 533-563.
  6. Prescott, Edward C., 1986. "Theory ahead of business-cycle measurement," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 11-44, January.
  7. Erceg, Christopher J. & Henderson, Dale W. & Levin, Andrew T., 2000. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 281-313, October.
  8. Peter N. Ireland, 2001. "Endogenous Money or Sticky Prices?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 499, Boston College Department of Economics.
  9. Argia Sbordone, 2002. "An optimizing model of U.S. wage and price dynamics," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
  10. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1982. "Sticky Prices in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1187-1211, December.
  11. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
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