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Did Nazis save more? Household saving and ideology in pre-war National Socialist Germany

  • Robin Winkler
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    It is commonly thought that the rapid increase in household saving during the early years of National Socialism was partly driven by ideological factors.� On this view, the popularity of the regime allowed it to exert 'moral suasion' on households to save more than they might have done in the absence of such indoctrination.� This paper employs the previously unpublished raw data from a household budget survey conducted in 1937 to identify ideological heterogeneity at the household level.� Assuming that households' responsiveness to the regime's saving propaganda was a function of their exogenous ideological commitment to National Socialism, the paper tests the hypothesis that Nazi households saved more than others.� The new evidence presented here does not confirm this hypothesis.

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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/12887/Finkler119.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 119.

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    Date of creation: 12 Sep 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:119
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    Web page: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/
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