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Are Wages Equal Across Sectors of Production? A Panel Data Analysis for Tradable and Non-Tradable Goods

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  • Achim Schmillen

    () (Osteuropa-Institut, Regensburg (Institut for East European Studies))

Abstract

The assumption that national labor markets are homogenous across tradable and non-tradable goods is common in multisector (open-economy) macro models and crucial for the prominent Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis. This study tests it with a novel method to distinguish the tradable and non-tradable sectors grounded in economic theory, modern empirical methods and a large and detailed macro data set. It finds that both the internal relationship between productivity and wages in the tradable and non-tradable sectors postulated by the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis and its external transmission mechanism are rejected.

Suggested Citation

  • Achim Schmillen, 2010. "Are Wages Equal Across Sectors of Production? A Panel Data Analysis for Tradable and Non-Tradable Goods," Working Papers 285, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
  • Handle: RePEc:ost:wpaper:285
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Luisito Bertinelli & Olivier Cardi & Romain Restout, 2015. "Technical Change Biased Toward the Traded Sector and Labor Market Frictions," Working Papers halshs-01252508, HAL.
    2. Cardi, Olivier & Restout, Romain, 2015. "Imperfect mobility of labor across sectors: a reappraisal of the Balassa–Samuelson effect," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 249-265.
    3. Frensch, Richard & Schmillen, Achim, 2011. "Can we identify Balassa-Samuelson effects with measures of product variety?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 98-108, March.
    4. Wessel N. Vermeulen, 2011. "External income, De-industrialisation and Labour Mobility," CREA Discussion Paper Series 11-20, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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