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Inter-forecast monetary policy implementation: fixed-instrument versus MCI-based strategies

Monetary policy authorities can adjust their instrument at any point in time to achieve their policy objective. In some countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom, policymakers choose to usually make adjustments only after a formal medium-term inflation forecast. Other countries, like Canada and New Zealand, have used simple inter-forecast strategies to make further instrument adjustments given unexpected developments in the exchange rate. These alternative strategies may be usefully thought of as fixing or banding a measure of "monetary conditions" that is comprised of the exchange rate and a short-term interest rate that is closely linked to the policy instrument. Such measures have come to be referred to as Monetary Conditions Indices (MCI).

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Paper provided by Reserve Bank of New Zealand in its series Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series with number G99/1.

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Length: 33p
Date of creation: Mar 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbdps:1999/01
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  1. Duguay, Pierre, 1994. "Empirical evidence on the strength of the monetary transmission mechanism in Canada: An aggregate approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 39-61, February.
  2. Svensson, Lars E O, 1996. "Inflation Forecast Targeting: Implementing and Monitoring Inflation Targets," CEPR Discussion Papers 1511, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Poole, William, 1970. "Optimal Choice of Monetary Policy Instruments in a Simple Stochastic Macro Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 197-216, May.
  4. Buiter, Willem H, 1988. "Death, Birth, Productivity Growth and Debt Neutrality," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(391), pages 279-93, June.
  5. F. Brayton & P. Tinsley, 1996. "A guide to FRB/US: a macroeconomic model of the United States," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 96-42, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Ben Hunt, 1995. "The effect of foreign demand shocks on the Canadian economy: An analysis using QPM," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 1995(Autumn), pages 23-32.
  7. Paul Conway & Aaron Drew & Ben Hunt & Alasdair Scott, 1998. "Exchange rate effects and inflation targeting in a small open economy: a stochastic analysis using FPS," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series G99/4, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  8. Richard Clarida & Jordi Gali & Mark Gertler, 1997. "Monetary Policy Rules in Practice: Some International Evidence," NBER Working Papers 6254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Weil, Philippe, 1989. "Overlapping families of infinitely-lived agents," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 183-198, March.
  10. Richard Dennis, 1997. "A measure of monetary conditions," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series G97/1, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  11. Aaron Drew & Ben Hunt, 1998. "The Forecasting and Policy System: stochastic simulations of the core model," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series G98/6, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
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