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Interactions of Public Paratransit and Vocational Rehabilitation

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  • Christopher M Clapp
  • Steven Stern
  • Steven Dan Yu

Abstract

Federal and state governments spend over $3 billion annually on public-sector Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs, yet almost a third of people with disabilities report having inadequate access to the transportation necessary to commute to a job, potentially negating the positive e¤ects of these interventions. We examine this previously understudied connection by assessing the impact access to public paratransit has on measures of VR program e¤ectiveness. To do so, we use the data and estimates from three previously estimated structural models of VR service receipt and labor market outcomes that contain limited information about mobility. We spatially link the generalized residuals from these models to di¤erent measures of the availability and effciency of local paratransit systems to determine whether paratransit explains any of the residual variation in the short- or long-run labor market outcomes of individuals receiving VR services. Results show that access to paratransit is an important determinant of the e¢ cacy of VR services, but that effects are heterogeneous across disability groups. We discuss the policy implications of our findings for VR programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher M Clapp & Steven Stern & Steven Dan Yu, 2017. "Interactions of Public Paratransit and Vocational Rehabilitation," Department of Economics Working Papers 17-12, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:nys:sunysb:17-12
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    File URL: http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/economics/research/papers/2017/PubParatransitInteractions_1712.pdf
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    1. Geweke, John, 1988. "Antithetic acceleration of Monte Carlo integration in Bayesian inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1-2), pages 73-89.
    2. David Dean & John Pepper & Robert Schmidt & Steven Stern, 2015. "The Effects Of Vocational Rehabilitation For People With Cognitive Impairments," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 399-426, May.
    3. Tom Mayock, 2016. "Wages, Housing Prices and Commutes," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 44(1), pages 258-300, February.
    4. Patrick Bajari & Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "Estimating Housing Demand With an Application to Explaining Racial Segregation in Cities," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 20-33, January.
    5. Kreider, Brent & Pepper, John V., 2007. "Disability and Employment: Reevaluating the Evidence in Light of Reporting Errors," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 102, pages 432-441, June.
    6. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1981. "Qualitative Response Models: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 19(4), pages 1483-1536, December.
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