IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/net/wpaper/1309.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Substitution and Complementarity between Fixed-line and Mobile Access

Author

Listed:
  • Lukasz Grzybowski

    () (Telecom ParisTech, Department of Economics and Social Sciences, 46 rue Barrault, 75013 Paris, France)

  • Frank Verboven

    () (University of Leuven and CEPR (London), Naamsestraat 69, 3000 Leuven, Belgium)

Abstract

We use rich survey data on 133,825 households from 27 EU countries during 2005-2011 to analyze substitution between fixed-line and mobile telecommunications services. We estimate a discrete choice model where households may choose between having mobile or fixed-line voice access only, or using both technologies at the same time. We obtain the following main findings. First, fixed-line and mobile connections are on average perceived as substitutes. But there is substantial heterogeneity across households and EU regions, with stronger substitution in Central and Eastern European countries. Second, there is strong complementarity between fixed-line and mobile connections that are offered by the fixed-line incumbent operator. This gives the incumbent a possibility to leverage its position in the fixed-line market into the mobile market. Third, fixed broadband technologies such as DSL and cable generate strong complementarities between fixed and mobile access, while mobile broadband strengthens substitution (at a smaller scale). The emergence of fixed broadband has thus been an important additional source through which incumbents leverage their strong position in the fixed-line network.

Suggested Citation

  • Lukasz Grzybowski & Frank Verboven, 2013. "Substitution and Complementarity between Fixed-line and Mobile Access," Working Papers 13-09, NET Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:net:wpaper:1309
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.netinst.org/Grzybowski_Verboven_13-09.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Grzybowski, Lukasz, 2014. "Fixed-to-mobile substitution in the European Union," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 601-612.
    2. Srinuan, Pratompong & Srinuan, Chalita & Bohlin, Erik, 2012. "Fixed and mobile broadband substitution in Sweden," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 237-251.
    3. Lukasz Grzybowski & Chiraz Karamti, 2010. "Competition In Mobile Telephony In France And Germany," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(6), pages 702-724, December.
    4. Rodini, Mark & Ward, Michael R. & Woroch, Glenn A., 0. "Going mobile: substitutability between fixed and mobile access," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 457-476, June.
    5. Matthew Gentzkow, 2007. "Valuing New Goods in a Model with Complementarity: Online Newspapers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 713-744, June.
    6. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521747387, Fall.
    7. Ward, Michael R. & Woroch, Glenn A., 2010. "The effect of prices on fixed and mobile telephone penetration: Using price subsidies as natural experiments," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 18-32, March.
    8. Michael R. Ward & Glenn A. Woroch, 2005. "Fixed-Mobile Telephone Subscription Substitution in the U.S," Working Papers 0501, University of Texas at Arlington, Department of Economics.
    9. Grzybowski, Lukasz & Nitsche, Rainer & Verboven, Frank & Wiethaus, Lars, 2014. "Market definition for broadband internet in Slovakia – Are fixed and mobile technologies in the same market?," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 39-56.
    10. Mélisande Cardona & Anton Schwarz & B. Yurtoglu & Christine Zulehner, 2009. "Demand estimation and market definition for broadband Internet services," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 70-95, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jinsoo Bae & Yun Jeong Choi & Jong-Hee Hahn, 2014. "Fixed and mobile broadband; Are they substitutes or complements?," Working papers 2014rwp-68, Yonsei University, Yonsei Economics Research Institute.
    2. Steffen Hoernig & Marc Bourreau & Carlo Cambini, 2014. "Fixed-Mobile Substitution and Termination Rates," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp588, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    3. repec:unl:unlfep:wp594 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Lange, Mirjam R. J. & Šaric, Amela, 2014. "Deregulating fixed voice services? Empirical evidence from the European Union," 20th ITS Biennial Conference, Rio de Janeiro 2014: The Net and the Internet - Emerging Markets and Policies 106864, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
    5. Kuroda, Toshifumi & Ida, Takanori & Koguchi, Teppei, 2015. "The impact of asymmetric regulation on product bundling: The case of fixed broadband and mobile communications in Japan," 2015 Regional ITS Conference, Los Angeles 2015 146318, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
    6. Marc Bourreau & Carlo Cambini & Steffen Hoernig, 2015. "Price distortion under fixed-mobile substitution," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 42(4), pages 441-454, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fixed-to-mobile substitution; incumbency advantage; broadband access;

    JEL classification:

    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L43 - Industrial Organization - - Antitrust Issues and Policies - - - Legal Monopolies and Regulation or Deregulation
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:net:wpaper:1309. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Nicholas Economides). General contact details of provider: http://www.NETinst.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.