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Deregulating fixed voice services? Empirical evidence from the European Union


  • Lange, Mirjam R. J.
  • Šaric, Amela


This paper analyzes the relationship between the traditional fixed-line, mobile and Voice over IP (VoIP) telephony in the EU. In doing so, it aims at filling the gap in the empirical literature on the substitution patterns between these technologies in a comprehensive way. It relies on demand estimation for fixed-line telephony using a unique data set comprising 25 EU member states for the 2006:Q2 - 2011:Q4 period. Employing instrumental variable approach, demand-side substitution for VoIP as well as mobile telephony services is found to be prevalent. Estimated short-run own- and cross-price elasticities are in the inelastic range, however, in the long run demand is clearly elastic. Hence, our results underpin the Europeans Commission's current decision to lift the ex ante regulation on the fixed-line telephony market.

Suggested Citation

  • Lange, Mirjam R. J. & Šaric, Amela, 2014. "Deregulating fixed voice services? Empirical evidence from the European Union," 20th ITS Biennial Conference, Rio de Janeiro 2014: The Net and the Internet - Emerging Markets and Policies 106864, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:itsb14:106864

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Barth, Anne-Kathrin & Heimeshoff, Ulrich, 2011. "Does the growth of mobile markets cause the demise of fixed networks? Evidence from the European Union," 22nd European Regional ITS Conference, Budapest 2011: Innovative ICT Applications - Emerging Regulatory, Economic and Policy Issues 52144, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
    2. Barth, Anne-Kathrin & Heimeshoff, Ulrich, 2012. "How large is the magnitude of fixed-mobile call substitution? Empirical evidence from 16 European countries," DICE Discussion Papers 49, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    3. Vogelsang, Ingo, 2010. "The relationship between mobile and fixed-line communications: A survey," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 4-17, March.
    4. Grzybowski, Lukasz, 2014. "Fixed-to-mobile substitution in the European Union," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 601-612.
    5. Ward, Michael R. & Woroch, Glenn A., 2010. "The effect of prices on fixed and mobile telephone penetration: Using price subsidies as natural experiments," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 18-32, March.
    6. Takanori Ida & Shin Kinoshita & Masayuki Sato, 2008. "Conjoint analysis of demand for IP telephony: the case of Japan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(10), pages 1279-1287.
    7. Cecere, Grazia & Corrocher, Nicoletta, 2011. "The intensity of VoIP usage in Great Britain: Users' characteristics and firms' strategies," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 522-531, July.
    8. Lukasz Grzybowski & Chiraz Karamti, 2010. "Competition In Mobile Telephony In France And Germany," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(6), pages 702-724, December.
    9. Rodini, Mark & Ward, Michael R. & Woroch, Glenn A., 0. "Going mobile: substitutability between fixed and mobile access," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 457-476, June.
    10. Wolfgang Briglauer & Anton Schwarz & Christine Zulehner, 2011. "Is fixed-mobile substitution strong enough to de-regulate fixed voice telephony? Evidence from the Austrian markets," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 50-67, February.
    11. Lukasz Grzybowski & Frank Verboven, 2013. "Substitution and Complementarity between Fixed-line and Mobile Access," Working Papers 13-09, NET Institute.
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    More about this item


    Fixed networks; Mobile services; Market definition; (De)regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • L43 - Industrial Organization - - Antitrust Issues and Policies - - - Legal Monopolies and Regulation or Deregulation
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications

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