IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/8523.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Household Responses to Public Home Care Programs

Author

Listed:
  • Peter C. Coyte
  • Mark Stabile

Abstract

A choice-theoretic model of household decision-making with respect to care-giving time allocations and the use of publicly and privately financed home care services is proposed. Predictions concerning the effect of increased availability of publicly financed home care services on home care utilization, informal care-giving, and health status are derived. These predictions are assessed through use of Canadian inter-provincial survey data on home care use and care-giving that are matched with data on home care funding for the period 1992 to 1998. Increased availability of publicly financed home care is associated with an increase in its utilization and a decline in informal care-giving, with this effect more pronounced among lower income Canadians. While self-reported health status was positively correlated with the increased availability of publicly financed home care, the perceived need for home care was invariant to this change.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter C. Coyte & Mark Stabile, 2001. "Household Responses to Public Home Care Programs," NBER Working Papers 8523, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8523
    Note: HC
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w8523.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hoerger, Thomas J & Picone, Gabriel A & Sloan, Frank A, 1996. "Public Subsidies, Private Provision of Care and Living Arrangements of the Elderly," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 428-440, August.
    2. Alan M. Garber, 1989. "Long-Term Care, Wealth, and Health of the Disabled Elderly Living in the Community," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Aging, pages 255-278, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Liliana E. Pezzin & Peter Kemper & James Reschovsky, 1996. "Does Publicly Provided Home Care Substitute for Family Care? Experimental Evidence with Endogenous Living Arrangements," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(3), pages 650-676.
    4. Ettner, Susan L, 1994. "The Effect of the Medicaid Home Care Benefit on Long-Term Care Choices of the Elderly," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 103-127, January.
    5. David M. Cutler & Louise Sheiner, 1994. "Policy Options for Long-Term Care," NBER Chapters, in: Studies in the Economics of Aging, pages 395-442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 1999. "Aging and the Growth of Long-Term Care," NBER Working Papers 6980, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Sarma, Sisira & Hawley, Gordon & Basu, Kisalaya, 2009. "Transitions in living arrangements of Canadian seniors: Findings from the NPHS longitudinal data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(6), pages 1106-1113, March.
    3. Sarma, Sisira & Simpson, Wayne, 2007. "A panel multinomial logit analysis of elderly living arrangements: Evidence from aging in Manitoba longitudinal data, Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(12), pages 2539-2552, December.
    4. Orsini, Chiara, 2010. "Changing the way the elderly live: Evidence from the home health care market in the United States," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-2), pages 142-152, February.
    5. Hollingsworth, Bruce & Ohinata, Asako & Picchio, Matteo & Walker, Ian, 2017. "Labour supply and informal care supply: The impacts of financial support for long-term elderly care," GLO Discussion Paper Series 118, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. Tsai, Yuping, 2015. "Social security income and the utilization of home care: Evidence from the social security notch," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 45-55.
    7. Judite Gonçalves & France Weaver, 2017. "Effects of formal home care on hospitalizations and doctor visits," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 203-233, June.
    8. Joan Costa-i-Font & Sergi Jimenez-Martin & Cristina Vilaplana, 2016. "Thinking of Incentivizing Care? The Effect of Demand Subsidies on Informal Caregiving and Intergenerational Transfers," CESifo Working Paper Series 6124, CESifo.
    9. Christophe Courbage & Guillem Montoliu-Montes & Joël Wagner, 2020. "The effect of long-term care public benefits and insurance on informal care from outside the household: empirical evidence from Italy and Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 21(8), pages 1131-1147, November.
    10. Darius N. Lakdawalla & Robert Schoeni, 2003. "Is nursing home demand affected by the decline in age difference between spouses?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 8(10), pages 279-304.
    11. Matteo Lippi Bruni & Cristina Ugolini, 2006. "Assistenza a domicilio e assistenza residenziale: politiche di intervento e analisi empirica," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 241-268.
    12. Fan, Ying & Fang, Shuai & Yang, Zan, 2018. "Living arrangements of the elderly: A new perspective from choice constraints in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 101-116.
    13. Thomas Barnay & Sandrine Juin, 2014. "Does care to dependent elderly people living at home increase their mental health?," TEPP Working Paper 2014-06, TEPP.
    14. Charles, Kerwin Kofi & Sevak, Purvi, 2005. "Can family caregiving substitute for nursing home care?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1174-1190, November.
    15. Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2016. "Dynamic modelling of long-term care decisions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 463-488, June.
    16. Quitterie Roquebert & Roméo Fontaine & Agnès Gramain, 2016. "L'aide à un parent âgé, seul et dépendant : déterminants structurels et interactions," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01316903, HAL.
    17. Quitterie Roquebert & Roméo Fontaine & Agnès Gramain, 2016. "L'aide à un parent âgé, seul et dépendant : déterminants structurels et interactions," Post-Print halshs-01316903, HAL.
    18. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Norton, Edward C., 2004. "Informal care and health care use of older adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1159-1180, November.
    19. Christophe Courbage & Guillem Montoliu-Montes & Joël Wagner, 0. "The effect of long-term care public benefits and insurance on informal care from outside the household: empirical evidence from Italy and Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 0, pages 1-17.
    20. Hsin-Ling Hsieh & Shin-Yi Chou & Echu Liu & Hsien-Ming Lien, 2015. "Strengthening or Weakening? The Impact of Universal Health Insurance on Intergenerational Coresidence in Taiwan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 883-904, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8523. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.