IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/6276.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Graduation to Health Insurance Coverage: 1981-1996

Author

Listed:
  • Sherry Glied
  • Mark Stabile

Abstract

entrants, provides an early indicator of the strengths and weaknesses of the employer-sponsored health insurance system. Insurance coverage for these men has fallen sharply over the past 15 years. We examine patterns of health insurance coverage for cohorts of young men using successive cross-sectional surveys and longitudinal data. We find that coverage declines persist and are exacerbated as young men age. Not only did cohorts of men born during the 1950s fail to age into employer-sponsored coverage as they reached their 30s and 40s, they actually lost such coverage as they grew older. Furthermore, young men who lacked coverage when they were in their mid-20s were unlikely to gain such coverage later. Declines in coverage are sharpest among the least educated cohorts of young men. We show that most of this decline was due to the substantial increase in health insurance costs during the 1980s. By contrasting young men's pension receipt experience with their health insurance experience, we show that structural changes in the labor market cannot explain any of the decline in coverage within cohorts. Our results suggest that the existing system of employer-sponsored health insurance subsidies did not compensate for the declines in earnings and increases in health insurance costs faced by young men between 1981 and 1996.

Suggested Citation

  • Sherry Glied & Mark Stabile, 1997. "Graduation to Health Insurance Coverage: 1981-1996," NBER Working Papers 6276, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6276
    Note: HE
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w6276.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Yamaguchi, Shintaro, 2010. "The effect of match quality and specific experience on career decisions and wage growth," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 407-423, April.
    2. Ghosh, Suman, 2007. "Job mobility and careers in firms," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 603-621, June.
    3. Jeremy T. Fox, 2010. "Estimating the Employer Switching Costs and Wage Responses of Forward-Looking Engineers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 357-412, April.
    4. Miyoshi, Koyo, 2008. "Male-female wage differentials in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 479-496, December.
    5. John S. Earle & Klara Z. Sabirianova, 2002. "How Late to Pay? Understanding Wage Arrears in Russia," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 661-707, July.
    6. Parent, Daniel, 1999. "Wages and Mobility: The Impact of Employer-Provided Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(2), pages 298-317, April.
    7. Fehr, Ernst & Goette, Lorenz, 2005. "Robustness and real consequences of nominal wage rigidity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 779-804, May.
    8. Carolyn Pitchik, 2008. "Self-Promoting Investments," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 164(3), pages 381-406, September.
    9. Nachum Sicherman, 1996. "Gender Differences in Departures from a Large Firm," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(3), pages 484-505, April.
    10. Rolf Aaberge & Anders Björklund & Markus Jäntti & Mårten Palme & Peder J. Pedersen & Nina Smith & Tom Wennemo, 2002. "Income Inequality and Income Mobility in the Scandinavian Countries Compared to the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(4), pages 443-469, December.
    11. Jean-Marc Robin & Costas Meghir & Christian Dustmann & Jerome Adda, 2013. "Career Progression, Economic Downturns, and Skills," 2013 Meeting Papers 993, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Alberto Bayo-Moriones & Jose E. Galdon-Sanchez & Maia Güell, 2010. "Is seniority-based pay used as a motivational device? Evidence from plant-level data," Research in Labor Economics, in: Solomon W. Polachek & Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.),Jobs, Training, and Worker Well-being, volume 30, pages 155-187, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    13. Rebecca Riley & Simon Kirby, 2006. "The Returns to General versus Job-Specific Skills: the Role of Information and Communication Technology," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 274, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    14. Isabel Cairó & Tomaz Cajner, 2018. "Human Capital and Unemployment Dynamics: Why More Educated Workers Enjoy Greater Employment Stability," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(609), pages 652-682, March.
    15. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/6ggbvnr6munghes9od0s108ro is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Masakatsu Okubo, 2015. "Earnings Dynamics and Profile Heterogeneity: Estimates from Japanese Panel Data," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(1), pages 112-146, March.
    17. Adda & Dustmann, 2004. "Career Progression and Formal versus on the Job Training," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 492, Econometric Society.
    18. Jeremy Lise & Costas Meghir & Jean-Marc Robin, 2016. "Matching, Sorting and Wages," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 19, pages 63-87, January.
    19. Christopher Taber & Rune Vejlin, 2020. "Estimation of a Roy/Search/Compensating Differential Model of the Labor Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(3), pages 1031-1069, May.
    20. Huffman, Wallace E., 1996. "Farm Labor: Key Conceptual and Measurement Issues on the Route to Better Farm Cost and Return Estimates," ISU General Staff Papers 199604010800001279, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    21. Mengistae, Taye, 1999. "The relative effects of skill formation and job matching on wage growth in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2104, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6276. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.