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Infrastructure and Public R&D Investments, and the Growth of Factor Productivity in US Manufacturing Industries

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  • M. Ishaq Nadiri
  • Theofanis P. Mamuneas

Abstract

In this paper we examine the effects of publicly financed infrastructure and R&D capital on the cost structure and productivity performance of twelve two-digit U.S. manufacturing industries. A general framework is developed to measure contribution of demand, relative input prices, technical change, as well as publicly financed capital on total factor productivity growth. The magnitude of the contribution of these sources varies considerably across industries: in some changes in demand dominate while in others changes in technology or relative prices are the main contributors. Publicly financed infrastructure and R&D capital contribute to productivity growth. However, the magnitudes of their contribution vary considerably across industries and on the whole they are not the major contributors to TFP in these industries.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Ishaq Nadiri & Theofanis P. Mamuneas, 1994. "Infrastructure and Public R&D Investments, and the Growth of Factor Productivity in US Manufacturing Industries," NBER Working Papers 4845, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4845
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aschauer, David Alan, 1989. "Is public expenditure productive?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 177-200, March.
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    3. Bernstein, Jeffrey I. & Nadiri, M. Ishaq, 1990. "Product Demand, Cost Of Production, Spillovers And The Social Rate Or Return To R&D," Working Papers 90-53, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    4. Ernst R. Berndt & Bengt Hansson, 1991. "Measuring the Contribution of Public Infrastructure Capital in Sweden," NBER Working Papers 3842, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Garcia-Mila, Teresa & McGuire, Therese J., 1992. "The contribution of publicly provided inputs to states' economies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 229-241, June.
    6. Randall W. Eberts, 1986. "Estimating the contribution of urban public infrastructure to regional growth," Working Paper 8610, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rivas, Luis A., 2003. "Income taxes, spending composition and long-run growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 477-503, June.
    2. Rioja, Felix K., 1999. "Productiveness and welfare implications of public infrastructure: a dynamic two-sector general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 387-404, April.
    3. Philip R. Gerson, 1998. "The Impact of Fiscal Policy Variables on Output Growth," IMF Working Papers 98/1, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Francesco Di Comite & D'Artis Kancs, 2015. "Macro-Economic Models for R&D and Innovation Policies - A Comparison of QUEST, RHOMOLO, GEM-E3 and NEMESIS," JRC Working Papers JRC94323, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    5. M. Ishaq Nadiri & Banani Nandi, 1996. "The Changing Structure of Cost and Demand for the U.S. Telecommunications Industry," NBER Working Papers 5820, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Tarek M. Harchaoui & Faouzi Tarkhani & Paul Warren, 2004. "Public Infrastructure in Canada, 1961-2002," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 30(3), pages 303-318, September.
    7. Danny Leung & Yi Zheng, 2012. "What affects MFP in the long-run? Evidence from Canadian industries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(6), pages 727-738, February.
    8. Chansarn, Supachet, 2005. "The efficiency in Thai financial sector after the financial crisis," MPRA Paper 1776, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2006.
    9. Jan-Egbert Sturm & Gerard H. Kuper,, 1996. "The dual approach to the public capital hypothesis: the case of The Netherlands," Working Papers 26, Centre for Economic Research, University of Groningen and University of Twente.
    10. Bor, Yungchang Jeffery & Chuang, Yih-Chyi & Lai, Wei-Wen & Yang, Chung-Min, 2010. "A dynamic general equilibrium model for public R&D investment in Taiwan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 171-183, January.
    11. Petri Niininen, 2000. "Effect of publicly and privately financed R&D on total factor productivity growth," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 56-68, Spring.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms

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