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Cross-Border Banking

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  • Jonathan Eaton

Abstract

The banking systems of some countries export intermediation services to the rest of the world, while many other countries are net exporters of deposits to banks abroad and net importers of loans from banks abroad. Banking center countries typically have lower inflation, deeper financial systems, earn less government revenue from seigniorage, and have lower reserve money relative to bank assets than nonbanking-center countries. This paper develops a stylized model of regulated bank intermediation to examine the role of national monetary policy in determining the international competitiveness of a national banking system. Monetary policy takes the form of controlling the supply of reserve money and imposing restrictions on banks that generate a demand for reserve money (reserve requirements). The international competitiveness of a banking system is enhanced by having a monetary authority who places greater weight on the interests of existing creditors relative to debtors in its constituency, and who has less need to raise revenue from seigniorage. With complete integration of deposit and loan markets the location of intermediation can be indeterminate. Countries that receive more deposits can generate a given amount of seigniorage with less inflation. Monetary authorities in countries that experience deposit outflows may be tempted to impose capital controls in order to maintain their seigniorage base. One implication of the analysis is that integration of monetary policies can facilitate financial integration by reducing the incentive to relocate deposits to avoid the inflation tax.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Eaton, 1994. "Cross-Border Banking," NBER Working Papers 4686, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4686
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fischer, Stanley, 1982. "Seigniorage and the Case for a National Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(2), pages 295-313, April.
    2. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    3. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    4. Aliber, Robert Z, 1984. "International Banking: A Survey," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 16(4), pages 661-678, November.
    5. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Haufler & Ian Wooton, 2016. "Cross-Border Banking in Regulated Markets: Is Financial Integration Desirable?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6150, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Marcelo Bianconi, 1999. "A dynamic monetary model with costly foreign currency," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 321-342.
    3. Jose L. Fillat & Stefania Garetto & Arthur V. Smith, 2018. "What are the consequences of global banking for the international transmission of shocks? A quantitative analysis∗," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series dp-303, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    4. Niepmann, Friederike, 2015. "Banking across borders," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 244-265.
    5. Sul, Wonsik, 2000. "On the performance of the foreign subsidiaries of Korean banks: are securities investments really profitable?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 207-222.
    6. Haufler, Andreas & Wooton, Ian, 2015. "Capital regulation and trade in banking services," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113056, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Jose Fillat & Arthur Smith & Stefania Garetto, 2018. "To Branch or not to Branch? A Quantitative Evaluation of the Consequences of Global Banks’ Organization," 2018 Meeting Papers 1079, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Renee D. Nieberding, 2004. "Optimal Government Finance And Democracy In Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 29(2), pages 131-148, December.
    9. Chakraborty, Indraneel & Hai, Rong & Holter, Hans A. & Stepanchuk, Serhiy, 2017. "The real effects of financial (dis)integration: A multi-country equilibrium analysis of Europe," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 28-45.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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