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The Effect of News on Bond Prices: Evidence from the United Kingdom 1900-1920

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  • Douglas Elmendorf
  • Mary Hirshfeld
  • David Weil

Abstract

We study the relationship of non-quantitative news to bond prices. We select a set of major news events based solely on their significance as judged by historians, and examine the corresponding bond price movements. We find strong evidence that news has some influence on bond price movements, but we find no evidence that news can explain more than a small fraction of those movements.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas Elmendorf & Mary Hirshfeld & David Weil, 1992. "The Effect of News on Bond Prices: Evidence from the United Kingdom 1900-1920," NBER Working Papers 4234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4234
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hanna, Alan J. & Turner, John D. & Walker, Clive B., 2017. "News media and investor sentiment over the long run," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2017-06, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    2. Amelie Brune & Thorsten Hens & Marc Rieger & Mei Wang, 2015. "The war puzzle: contradictory effects of international conflicts on stock markets," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(1), pages 1-21, March.
    3. Campbell, Gareth & Quinn, William & Turner, John D. & Ye, Qing, 2015. "What moved share prices in the nineteenth-century London stock market?," QUCEH Working Paper Series 15-06, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

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