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Structural/Frictional and Demand-Deficient Unemployment in Local Labor Markets

  • Harry J. Holzer

This paper uses data on unemployment rates and job vacancy rates to measure structural/frictional and demand-deficient components of unemployment rate differences across local labor markets. Data on occupational and industrial distributions of unemployed workers and vacant jobs, as well as on local wages, recent sales growth, Unemployment Insurance, and demographics are then used to help account for these components of unemployment across local areas.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w2652.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 2652.

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Date of creation: Jul 1988
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Publication status: Published as "Employment, Unemployment and Demand Shifts in Local Labor Markets", Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 73, no. 1 (1991): 25-32.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:2652
Note: LS
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  1. John M. Barron & Wesley Mellow, 1979. "Search Effort in the Labor Market," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(3), pages 389-404.
  2. Abraham, Katharine G. & Katz, Lawrence F., 1986. "Cyclical Unemployment: Sectoral Shifts or Aggregate Disturbances?," Scholarly Articles 3442781, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. Freeman, Richard B, 1984. "Longitudinal Analyses of the Effects of Trade Unions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(1), pages 1-26, January.
  4. Reza, Ali M, 1978. "Geographical Differences in Earnings and Unemployment Rates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(2), pages 201-08, May.
  5. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1985. "Short-run Equilibrium Dynamics of Unemployment Vacancies, and Real Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 676-90, September.
  6. Murphy, Kevin J & Hofler, Richard A, 1984. "Determinants of Geographic Unemployment Rates: A Selectively Pooled-Simultaneous Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(2), pages 216-23, May.
  7. Moffitt, Robert & Nicholson, Walter, 1982. "The Effect of Unemployment Insurance on Unemployment: The Case of Federal Supplemental Benefits," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(1), pages 1-11, February.
  8. Stephen T. Marston, 1985. "Two Views of the Geographic Distribution of Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(1), pages 57-79.
  9. Stephen T. Marston, 1976. "Employment Instability and High Unemployment Rates," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(1), pages 169-210.
  10. Duffy, Martyn H, 1984. "The Relationship between Unemployment and Unfilled Vacancies in Great Britain: An Extended Job-Search, Labour Turnover View," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 143-72, November.
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