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How Do NYPD Officers Respond to Terror Threats?

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  • Steven F. Lehrer
  • Louis Pierre Lepage

Abstract

Using data from the New York City Police Department's Stop-and-Frisk program, we evaluate the impact of a specific terrorist attack threat from Al Qaeda on policing behavior in New York City. We find that after the Department of Homeland Security raised the alert level in response to this threat, people categorized as "Other" by the NYPD, including Arabs, were significantly more likely to be frisked and have force used against them yet no more likely to be arrested. These individuals were in turn less likely to be frisked or have force used against them immediately after the alert level returned to its baseline level. Further, evidence suggests that these impacts were larger in magnitude in police precincts that have a higher concentration of mosques. Our results are consistent with profiling by police officers leading to low-productivity stops, but we cannot rule out that it constitutes efficient policing given important differences between deterrence of terrorism versus other crimes.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven F. Lehrer & Louis Pierre Lepage, 2019. "How Do NYPD Officers Respond to Terror Threats?," NBER Working Papers 26438, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:26438
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mirko Draca & Stephen Machin & Robert Witt, 2011. "Panic on the Streets of London: Police, Crime, and the July 2005 Terror Attacks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2157-2181, August.
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    7. repec:cai:poeine:pope_1203_0349 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Steven F. Lehrer & Louis-Pierre Lepage, 2019. "Does Selective Crime Reporting Influence Our Ability to Detect Racial Discrimination in the Nypd’s Stop-and-Frisk Program?," Advances in Econometrics, in: Kim P. Huynh & David T. Jacho-chávez & Gautam Tripathi (ed.), The Econometrics of Complex Survey Data, volume 39, pages 259-286, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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