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Growth, Technological Progress, and Trade

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  • Elhanan Helpman

Abstract

Recent developments in the theory of economic growth and dynamic trade theory are reviewed and interpreted. These include growth based on economies of scale, trade with product development, and product cycles. It is argued that there is need for more work in this area in order to understand the relationship between trade and growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Elhanan Helpman, 1988. "Growth, Technological Progress, and Trade," NBER Working Papers 2592, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:2592
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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1989. "Product Development and International Trade," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1261-1283, December.
    3. Dollar, David, 1986. "Technological Innovations, Capital Mobility, and the Product Cycle inNorth-South Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 177-190, March.
    4. H. Oniki & H. Uzawa, 1965. "Patterns of Trade and Investment in a Dynamic Model of International Trade," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 15-37.
    5. Richard Jensen & Marie Thursby, 1987. "A Decision Theoretic Model of Innovation, Technology Transfer, and Trade," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(4), pages 631-647.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramos, Francisco F. Ribeiro, 2001. "Exports, imports, and economic growth in Portugal: evidence from causality and cointegration analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 613-623, December.
    2. Houssem Eddine Chebbi & Marcelo Olarreaga & Habib Zitouna, 2011. "Trade Openness Andco2emissions In Tunisia," Middle East Development Journal (MEDJ), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(01), pages 29-53.
    3. Francesco Paolo Mongelli, 2005. "What is European Economic and Monetary Union Telling us About the Properties of Optimum Currency Areas?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 607-635, September.
    4. Yolanda Fernández Lommen, 2000. "Crecimiento económico y comercio exterior en China," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 00-11, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.
    5. Sang-Yong Tom Lee & Xiao Jia Guo, 2004. "Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and Spillover: A Panel Analysis," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 722, Econometric Society.
    6. Peter Kugler, 1991. "Growth, exports and cointegration: An empirical investigation," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 127(1), pages 73-82, March.
    7. Siebert, Horst, 1991. "A Schumpeterian model of growth in the world economy: some notes on a new paradigm in international economics," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 1498, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    8. Asli Seda Bilman & Serdar Turkeli, 2013. "Interaction between international trade and economic growth: Evidence from qualitative comparative analysis," International Economics Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2(4), pages 5-18, December.
    9. Lu, Lina, 2017. "Simultaneous Spatial Panel Data Models with Common Shocks," Risk and Policy Analysis Unit Working Paper RPA 17-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

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