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Were the Nigerian Banking Reforms of 2005 A Success ... And for the Poor?

Listed author(s):
  • Lisa D. Cook

The Nigerian banking system was in crisis for much of the 1990's and early 2000's. The reforms of 2005 were ambitious in simultaneously attempting to address safety, soundness, and accessibility. This paper uses published and new survey data through 2008 to investigate whether bank consolidation and other measures achieved their stated goals and whether they also enhanced development, efficiency, and profitability. Following the reforms, banks are better capitalized, more efficient, and less involved in the public sector but not more profitable and accessible to the poor. While there is greater supervision and less fragility, recorded distress was artificially low. The improved macroeconomic environment also explains some of the variation in observed outcomes and likely enhanced the efficacy of reforms.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16890.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16890.

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Date of creation: Mar 2011
Publication status: published as Were the Nigerian Banking Reforms of 2005 a Success … and for the Poor? , Lisa D. Cook. in African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development , Edwards, Johnson, and Weil. 2016
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16890
Note: ME
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  1. Rajan, Raghuram G & Zingales, Luigi, 1998. "Financial Dependence and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 559-586, June.
  2. Laura N. Beny & Lisa D. Cook, 2009. "Metals or Management? Explaining Africa's Recent Economic Growth Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 268-274, May.
  3. Maria Soledad Martinez Peria & Ashoka Mody, 2004. "How foreign participation and market concentration impact bank spreads: evidence from Latin America," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 511-542.
  4. Hesse, Heiko, 2007. "Financial intermediation in the pre-consolidated banking sector in Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4267, The World Bank.
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