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Riding the Wave of Trade: Explaining the Rise of Labor Regulation in the Golden Age of Globalization

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  • Michael Huberman
  • Christopher M. Meissner

Abstract

The received view pins the adoption of labor regulation before 1914 on domestic forces. Using directed dyad-year event history analysis, we find that trade was also a pathway of diffusion. Market access served as an important instrument to encourage a level playing field. The type of trade mattered as much as the volume. In the European core, states emulated the labor regulation of partners because intraindustry trade was important. The New World exported less differentiated products and pressures to imitate were weak.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Huberman & Christopher M. Meissner, 2009. "Riding the Wave of Trade: Explaining the Rise of Labor Regulation in the Golden Age of Globalization," NBER Working Papers 15374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15374
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Drusilla K. Brown, 2001. "Labor Standards: Where Do They Belong on the International Trade Agenda?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 89-112, Summer.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J8 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N70 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - General, International, or Comparative

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