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Security Issue Timing: What Do Managers Know, and When Do They Know It?

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  • Dirk Jenter
  • Katharina Lewellen
  • Jerold B. Warner

Abstract

We study put option sales undertaken by corporations during their repurchase programs. Put sales' main theoretical motivation is market timing, providing an excellent framework for studying whether security issues reflect managers' ability to identify mispricing. Our evidence is that these bets reflect timing ability, and are not simply a result of overconfidence. In the 100 days following put option issues, there is roughly a 5% abnormal stock price return, and the abnormal return is concentrated around the first earnings release date following put option sales. Longer term effects are generally not detected. Put sales also appear to reflect successful bets on the direction of stock price volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Jenter & Katharina Lewellen & Jerold B. Warner, 2006. "Security Issue Timing: What Do Managers Know, and When Do They Know It?," NBER Working Papers 12724, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12724
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    1. Mitchell, Mark L & Stafford, Erik, 2000. "Managerial Decisions and Long-Term Stock Price Performance," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73(3), pages 287-329, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Missaka Warusawitharana & Toni M. Whited, 2016. "Equity Market Misvaluation, Financing, and Investment," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 29(3), pages 603-654.
    2. Edmans, Alex, 2011. "Does the stock market fully value intangibles? Employee satisfaction and equity prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 621-640, September.
    3. Rohov Heorhii K., 2014. "Factors of Selection of the Stock Allocation Method," Business Inform, RESEARCH CENTRE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS of NAS (KHARKIV, UKRAINE), Kharkiv National University of Economics, issue 3, pages 311-316.
    4. Gyoshev, Stanley & Kaplan, Todd R. & Szewczyk, Samuel & Tsetsekos, George, 2012. "Why Do Financial Intermediaries Buy Put Options from Companies?," MPRA Paper 43149, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Robert G. Eccles & Ioannis Ioannou & George Serafeim, 2012. "The Impact of Corporate Sustainability on Organizational Processes and Performance," NBER Working Papers 17950, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Carpentier, Cécile & Suret, Jean-Marc, 2015. "Stock market and deterrence effect: A mid-run analysis of major environmental and non-environmental accidents," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 1-18.
    7. Urzúa Infante, F., 2014. "Essays on ownership and control," Other publications TiSEM f17a9a42-f7a7-4ffa-a95d-a, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • G35 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Payout Policy

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