IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

A Test of Portfolio Crowding-Out and Related Issues in Finance

  • Jeffrey A. Frankel

This paper tests hypotheses regarding the parameters in investors'asset demand functions. Most important is the hypothesis that federal bonds are closer substitutes for equity than for money; it is associated with the hypothesis of "portfolio crowding out" by federal borrowing. Previous regression studies of asset demand functions have not been able to obtain precise and plausible estimates for the parameters, without the imposition of prior beliefs. The present paper uses a MLE technique that dominates regression in that it makes full use of the constraint that the parameters are not determined arbitrarily, but rather are determined by mean-variance optimization on the part of the investor. The technique also dominates, on the other hand, previous estimates of the optimal portfolio from ex post return data, in that expected returns are not assumed to be constant over time, or to change slowly, but rather are allowed to fluctuate freely. Thus the framework is consistent with questions such as the effects of a sudden increase in federal debt on the expected returns of the various assets.Some hypotheses are tested where the answer seems clear in advance, such as a negative effect of the supply of money on the expected rate of return on equities. There the results of the MLE technique are much more plausible than the regression results. In the case of greatest controversy, a point estimate shows portfolio crowding in, not portfolio crowding out.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w1205.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 1205.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Sep 1983
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as Frankel, Jeffrey A. "Portfolio Crowding-Out Empirically Estimated," Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 100, Supplement, (1985), pp. 1041-1065.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1205
Note: ME
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Web page: http://www.nber.orgEmail:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. William D. Nordhaus & Steven N. Durlauf, 1982. "The Structure of Social Risk," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 648, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  2. Masson, Paul R, 1978. "Structural Models of the Demand for Bonds and the Term Structure of Interest Rates," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 45(180), pages 363-77, November.
  3. Barro, Robert J, 1974. "Are Government Bonds Net Wealth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1095-1117, Nov.-Dec..
  4. Backus, David, et al, 1980. "A Model of U.S. Financial and Nonfinancial Economic Behavior," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 12(2), pages 259-93, Special I.
  5. Jeffrey A. Frankel & William T. Dickens, 1986. "Are Asset Demand Functions Determined by CAPM?," NBER Working Papers 1113, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Zvi Bodie & Alex Kane & Robert L. McDonald, 1983. "Why Are Real Interest Rates So High?," NBER Working Papers 1141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. William C. Brainard & James Tobin, 1968. "Pitfalls in Financial Model-Building," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 244, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  8. Roley, V Vance, 1979. "A Theory of Federal Debt Management," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 915-26, December.
  9. Friend, Irwin & Blume, Marshall E, 1975. "The Demand for Risky Assets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(5), pages 900-922, December.
  10. Friedman, Benjamin Morton, 1977. "Financial Flow Variables and the Short-Run Determination of Long-Term Interest Rates," Scholarly Articles 4554309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  11. Blinder, Alan S. & Solow, Robert M., 1973. "Does fiscal policy matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 319-337.
  12. Smith, Gary N & Brainard, William C, 1976. "The Value of A Priori Information in Estimating a Financial Model," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 31(5), pages 1299-1322, December.
  13. Merton, Robert C, 1973. "An Intertemporal Capital Asset Pricing Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 41(5), pages 867-87, September.
  14. E.K. Berndt & B.H. Hall & R.E. Hall, 1974. "Estimation and Inference in Nonlinear Structural Models," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 3, number 4, pages 103-116 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Fair, Ray C & Malkiel, Burton G, 1971. "The Determination of Yield Differentials between Debt Instruments of the Same Maturity," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 3(4), pages 733-49, November.
  16. Blanchard, Olivier J & Plantes, Mary Kay, 1977. "A Note on Gross Substitutability of Financial Assets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(3), pages 769-71, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1205. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.