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Fooling Ourselves: Evaluating the Globalization and Growth Debate

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  • Juan Carlos Hallak
  • James Levinsohn

Abstract

This paper evaluates how much of the economics profession has evaluated the evidence on the relationship between international trade and economic growth. The paper highlights the basic approaches to the trade and growth question that the literature has adopted. The case is made that more attention needs to be paid to the mechanisms by which trade impacts growth and that future research should move away from a focus on outcomes and look instead at these mechanisms.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Carlos Hallak & James Levinsohn, 2004. "Fooling Ourselves: Evaluating the Globalization and Growth Debate," NBER Working Papers 10244, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:10244
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    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade

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