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Addictive behavior in cinema demand: evidence from Korea

Author

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  • Sangho KIM

    (College of Business, Honam University, Gwangju 506-714, KOREA)

  • Donghyun PARK

    (Economics and Research Department (ERD), Asian Development Bank (ADB), 6 ADB Avenue, Mandaluyong City, PHILIPPINES 1550)

Abstract

It is intuitively plausible that the demand for cinema services may be partly driven by addiction or habit. Yet there is almost no empirical literature which tests for whether cinema demand is addictive. We estimate addiction models for cinema demand using Korean time series data from 1963 to 2004. Our estimation results indicate that (i) addictive behavior characterizes the demand for cinema services, (ii) this behavior is rational, and (iii) habit is one of most important determinants of cinema demand. Our results also reveal that cinema attendance is generally insensitive to admission price and unrelated to income.

Suggested Citation

  • Sangho KIM & Donghyun PARK, 2010. "Addictive behavior in cinema demand: evidence from Korea," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1002, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:nan:wpaper:1002
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    File URL: http://www3.ntu.edu.sg/hss2/egc/wp/2010/2010-02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Russell Davidson & James G. MacKinnon, 1999. "Artificial Regressions," Working Papers 978, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    2. Victor Ginsburgh & Sheila Weyers, 1999. "On the Perceived Quality of Movies," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 23(4), pages 269-283, November.
    3. Michael J. Moore & Philip J. Cook, 1995. "Habit and Heterogeneity in the Youthful Demand for Alcohol," NBER Working Papers 5152, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ralf Dewenter & Michael Westermann, 2005. "Cinema Demand In Germany," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(3), pages 213-231, August.
    5. Peter Macmillan & Ian Smith, 2001. "Explaining Post-War Cinema Attendance in Great Britain," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 25(2), pages 91-108, May.
    6. Becker, Gary S & Grossman, Michael & Murphy, Kevin M, 1994. "An Empirical Analysis of Cigarette Addiction," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 396-418, June.
    7. Paulo Brito & Carlos Barros, 2005. "Learning-by-Consuming and the Dynamics of the Demand and Prices of Cultural Goods," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(2), pages 83-106, May.
    8. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1989. "Testing for Consistency using Artificial Regressions," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(03), pages 363-384, December.
    9. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
    10. VÍctor Blanco & JosÉ BaÑos Pino, 1997. "Cinema Demand in Spain: A Cointegration Analysis," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 21(1), pages 57-75, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Alderighi & Eleonora Lorenzini, 2012. "Cultural goods, cultivation of taste, satisfaction and increasing marginal utility during vacations," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 36(1), pages 1-26, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cinema demand; rational addiction; myopic addiction; two-stages least squares; time-series analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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