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The IMF-WB Debt Sustainability Framework: Procedures, Applications and Criticisms

Author

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  • Danny Cassimon

    () (IOB, University of Antwerp)

  • Dennis Essers

    () (IOB, University of Antwerp)

  • Karel Verbeke

    () (IOB, University of Antwerp)

Abstract

At the completion of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative and the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI), eligible countries’ public debt sustainability was restored. To ensure that irresponsible borrowing (and lending) policies do not derail debt again, the World Bank and IMF jointly developed the Debt Sustainability Framework (DSF) for low-income countries (LICs). In this article we explain how the DSF works, discuss the different creditor policies the output of the DSF informs, and highlight a number of critiques on the framework. We end by looking at potential modifications to the DSF.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Danny Cassimon & Dennis Essers & Karel Verbeke, 2016. "The IMF-WB Debt Sustainability Framework: Procedures, Applications and Criticisms," BeFinD Policy Briefs 3, University of Namur, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:nam:befdpb:3
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    File URL: http://www.befind.be/publications/PBs/PB3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. berlage, Lodewijk & cassimon, Danny & dreze, Jacques & Reding, Paul, 2003. "Prospective Aid and Indebtedness Relief: A Proposal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1635-1654, October.
    2. Ugo PANIZZA, 2015. "Debt Sustainability in Low-Income Countries - The Grants versus Loans Debate in a World without Crystal Balls," Working Papers P120, FERDI.
    3. Andrew Berg & Enrico G Berkes & Catherine A Pattillo & Andrea F Presbitero & Yorbol Yakhshilikov, 2014. "Assessing Bias and Accuracy in the World Bank-IMF's Debt Sustainability Framework for Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 2014/048, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Andrew Berg & Rafael A Portillo & Edward F Buffie & Catherine A Pattillo & Luis-Felipe Zanna, 2012. "Public Investment, Growth, and Debt Sustainability; Putting together the Pieces," IMF Working Papers 2012/144, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Dani Rodrik, 2008. "Second-Best Institutions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 100-104, May.
    6. Ugo Panizza, 2008. "The External Debt Contentious Six Years after the Monterrey Consensus," G-24 Discussion Papers 51, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
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    Cited by:

    1. Danny Cassimon & Dennis Essers & Karel Verbeke, 2018. "Sovereign Debt Workouts: Quo Vadis?," Africagrowth Agenda, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 15(3), pages 4-8.
    2. Danny Cassimon & Dennis Essers & Karel Verbeke, 2016. "The changing face of Rwanda's public debt," BeFinD Working Papers 0114, University of Namur, Department of Economics.

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