IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/msm/wpaper/2013-17.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Development

Author

Listed:
  • Wim Naudé

    (Maastricht School of Management, UNU-MERIT, University of Maastricht and IZA- Institute for the Study of Labour)

  • Adam Szirmai

    (UNU-MERIT and Maastricht Graduate School of Governance, University of Maastricht)

Abstract

What is the relationship between technological innovation, entrepreneurship and development? Is it better for developing countries to coping and adapt existing technologies from richer countries rather than undertake or promote intensive research and development (R&D) of their own? We tackle these perennial issues afresh by considering the relationship between knowledge, innovation and growth in the past and by identifying whether and how the scope for catch-up growth exists. We focus on the interesting case of technological innovation in the comparative economic performance of China; we draw some lessons for development elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Wim Naudé & Adam Szirmai, 2013. "Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Development," Working Papers 2013/17, Maastricht School of Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:msm:wpaper:2013/17
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://web2.msm.nl/RePEc/msm/wpaper/MSM-WP2013-17.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kemeny, Thomas, 2010. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Drive Technological Upgrading?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 1543-1554, November.
    2. Lipsey, Richard G. & Carlaw, Kenneth I. & Bekar, Clifford T., 2005. "Economic Transformations: General Purpose Technologies and Long-Term Economic Growth," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199290895.
    3. Diego A. Comin & Martí Mestieri Ferrer, 2013. "If Technology Has Arrived Everywhere, Why has Income Diverged?," NBER Working Papers 19010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Scott Shane, 2009. "Why encouraging more people to become entrepreneurs is bad public policy," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 141-149, August.
    5. Szirmai, Adam, 2012. "Proximate, intermediate and ultimate causality: Theories and experiences of growth and development," MERIT Working Papers 032, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    innovation; entrepreneurship; development; knowledge; China; BRICS;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • L52 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Industrial Policy; Sectoral Planning Methods
    • L53 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Enterprise Policy
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:msm:wpaper:2013/17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Maud de By). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/msmmmnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.