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An Assessment of the Perceived Learning by Millennials during One-Day One-Topic Marketing Simulations

Author

Listed:
  • Timothy E. Burson

    (McColl School of Business, Queens University of Charlotte)

  • Bradley W. Brooks

    (McColl School of Business, Queens University of Charlotte)

  • Steven Cox

    (McColl School of Business, Queens University of Charlotte)

Abstract

Millennials have been characterized as active learners who seek engaging, customized, and relevant educational experiences. Born in the digital era they expect rapid feedback and an environment where they can quickly test different strategies. Simulations would seem to mesh well with Millennial learning styles. However, professors have often criticized simulations as too complex, too time consuming, and unfocused. Recently, a new group of simulations have been developed which focus on a single issue, are simple to learn, and can be completed within a single class period. This research explores how Millennials will find these simplified products in terms of the learning experience and subject matter mastery.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy E. Burson & Bradley W. Brooks & Steven Cox, 2012. "An Assessment of the Perceived Learning by Millennials during One-Day One-Topic Marketing Simulations," Discussion Paper Series 2012-01, McColl School of Business, Queens University of Charlotte.
  • Handle: RePEc:msb:wpaper:2012-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, William E & Watts, Michael, 1995. "Teaching Tools: Teaching Methods in Undergraduate Economics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(4), pages 692-700, October.
    2. Michael K. Salemi, 2002. "An Illustrated Case for Active Learning," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 68(3), pages 721-731, January.
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