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Reconciling Findings on the Employment Effect of Disability Insurance

Author

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  • John Bound
  • Stephan Lindner
  • Timothy Waldmann

Abstract

Over the last 25 years, the Social Security Disability Insurance Program (DI) has grown dramatically. During the same period, employment rates for men with work limitations showed substantial declines in both absolute and relative terms. While the timing of these trends suggests that the expansion of DI was a major contributor to employment decline among this group, raising questions about the targeting of disability benefits, studies using denied applicants suggest a more modest role of the DI expansion.

Suggested Citation

  • John Bound & Stephan Lindner & Timothy Waldmann, 2014. "Reconciling Findings on the Employment Effect of Disability Insurance," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 13514294569349e1a9d2f68f4, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:13514294569349e1a9d2f68f4d84adb6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chen, Susan & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2008. "The work disincentive effects of the disability insurance program in the 1990s," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 757-784, February.
    2. David Autor & Nicole Maestas & Kathleen Mullen & Alexander Strand, 2011. "Does Delay Cause Decay? The Effect of Administrative Decision Time on the Labor Force Participation and Earnings of Disability Applicants," Working Papers wp258, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    3. Nicole Maestas & Kathleen J. Mullen & Alexander Strand, 2013. "Does Disability Insurance Receipt Discourage Work? Using Examiner Assignment to Estimate Causal Effects of SSDI Receipt," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1797-1829, August.
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    1. Why Study Economics?
      by Mark Thoma in Economist's View on 2016-09-27 14:14:56
    2. Why Study Economics?
      by ? in Noozilla Top on 2016-09-27 21:00:00
    3. Why Study Economics?
      by ? in The Big Picture on 2016-09-28 14:00:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gina Livermore & David Wittenburg & David Neumark, 2014. "Finding alternatives to disability benefit receipt," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-9, December.
    2. Robert A. Moffitt, 2012. "The Reveral of the Employment-Population Ratio in the 2000s: Facts and Explanations," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 43(2 (Fall)), pages 201-264.
    3. Robert A. Moffitt, 2012. "The U.S. Employment-Population Reversal in the 2000s: Facts and Explanations," Economics Working Paper Archive 604, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
    4. Sudipto Banerjee & David Blau, 2013. "Employment Trends by Age in the United States: Why Are Older Workers Different?," Working Papers wp285, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social security disability insurance program; Employment trends; Disability;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

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