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Health human resources planning and the production of health: Development of an extended analytical framework for needs-based health human resources planning

  • Stephen Birch
  • George Kephart
  • Gail Tomblin-Murphy
  • Linda O'Brien-Pallas
  • Rob Alder
  • Adrian MacKenzie
Registered author(s):

    Traditional approaches to health human resources planning emphasize the role of demographic change on the needs for health human resources. Conceptual frameworks have been presented that recognize the limited role of demographic change and the broader determinants of health human resource requirements. Nevertheless, practical applications of health human resources planning continue to base plans on the size and demographic mix of the population applied to simple population-provider or population-utilization ratios. In this paper an analytical framework is developed based on the production of health care services and the multiple determinants of health human resource requirements. In this framework attention is focused on estimating the ‘flow’ of services required to meet the needs of the population that is then translated into the required ‘stock’ of providers to deliver this ‘flow’ of services. The requirements for human resources in the future is shown to depend on four elements: the size and demographic mix of the population (demography), the levels of risks to health and morbidity in the population (epidemiology), the services deemed appropriate to address the levels of risks to health and morbidity (standards of care), and the rate of service delivery by providers (productivity). Application of the framework is illustrated using hypothetical scenarios.

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    File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap168.pdf
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    Paper provided by McMaster University in its series Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers with number 168.

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    Length: 39 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:mcm:sedapp:168
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    1. Kevin Milligan, 2005. "Life-cycle asset accumulation and allocation in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(3), pages 1057-1106, August.
    2. Neil J. Buckley & Frank T. Denton & A. Leslie Robb & Byron G. Spencer, 2004. "Healthy Aging at Older Ages: Are Income and Education Important?," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 123, McMaster University.
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