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Medical Technology And The Production Of Health Care



This paper investigates the factors that determine differences across OECD countries in health outcomes, using data on life expectancy at age 65, over the period 1960 to 2007. We estimate a production function where life expectancy depends on health and social spending, lifestyle variables, and medical innovation. Our first set of regressions includes a set of observed medical technologies by country. Our second set of regressions proxy technology using a spatial process. The paper also tests whether in the long-run countries tend to achieve similar levels of health outcomes. Our results show that health spending has a significant and mild effect on health out- comes, even after controlling for medical innovation. However, its short-run adjustments do not seem to have an impact on health care productivity. Spatial spill overs in life expectancy are significant and point to the existence of interdependence across countries in technology adoption. Furthermore, nations with initial low levels of life expectancy tend to catch up with those with longer-lived populations.

Suggested Citation

  • Badi H. Baltagi & Francesco Moscone & Elisa Tosetti, 2011. "Medical Technology And The Production Of Health Care," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 130, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  • Handle: RePEc:max:cprwps:130

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kuhn, Michael & Prettner, Klaus, 2016. "Growth and welfare effects of health care in knowledge-based economies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 100-119.
    2. Moscone, Francesco & Tosetti, Elisa & Costantini, Marco & Ali, Maged, 2013. "The impact of scientific research on health care: Evidence from the OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 325-332.
    3. Kuhn, Michael & Frankovic, Ivan & Wrzaczek, Stefan, 2017. "Medical Progress, Demand for Health Care, and Economic Performance," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168249, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Eibich, Peter & Ziebarth, Nicolas, 2014. "Examining the Structure of Spatial Health Effects in Germany Using Hierarchical Bayes Models," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 305-320.
    5. Ivan Frankovic & Michael Kuhn & Stefan Wrzaczek, 2016. "Medical Care within an OLG Economy with Realistic Demography," VID Working Papers 1603, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
    6. Kuhn, Michael & Wrzaczek, Stefan & Prskawetz, Alexia & Feichtinger, Gustav, 2015. "Optimal choice of health and retirement in a life-cycle model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PA), pages 186-212.
    7. Wen-Yi Chen & Miin-Jye Wen & Yu-Hui Lin & Yia-Wun Liang, 2016. "On the relationship between healthcare expenditure and longevity: evidence from the continuous wavelet analyses," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1041-1057, May.
    8. Spyros Arvanitis & Euripidis N. Loukis, 2016. "Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals: an exploratory study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(4), pages 403-418, May.
    9. Cappellari, Lorenzo & De Paoli, Anna & Turati, Gilberto, 2014. "Do Market Incentives in the Hospital Industry Affect Subjective Health Perceptions? Evidence from the Italian PPS-DRG Reform," IZA Discussion Papers 8636, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Yia-Wun Liang & Wen-Yi Chen & Yu-Hui Lin, 2015. "Estimating a Hospital Production Function to Evaluate the Effect of Nurse Staffing on Patient Mortality in Taiwan: The Longitudinal Count Data Approach," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 154-169, December.
    11. Lorenzo Cappellari & Anna De Paoli & Gilberto Turati, 2016. "Do market incentives for hospitals affect health and service utilization?: evidence from prospective pay system–diagnosis-related groups tariffs in Italian regions," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(4), pages 885-905, October.
    12. García-Romero, Antonio & Escribano, Álvaro & Tribó, Josep A., 2017. "The impact of health research on length of stay in Spanish public hospitals," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 591-604.
    13. Akinwande A. Atanda & Andrea K. Menclova & W. Robert Reed, 2016. "Is Health Care Infected by Baumol’s Cost Disease? Test of a New Model," Working Papers in Economics 16/33, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    14. Reibling, Nadine, 2013. "The international performance of healthcare systems in population health: Capabilities of pooled cross-sectional time series methods," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 122-132.
    15. Spyros Arvanitis & Euripidis N. Loukis, 2014. "Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals," KOF Working papers 14-366, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    16. Akinwande A. Atanda & Andrea K. Menclova & W. Robert Reed, 2016. "Is Health Care Infected by Baumol’s Cost Disease? Test of a New Model Using an OECD Dataset," Working Papers in Economics 16/04, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.

    More about this item


    Life expectancy; health care production; health expenditure; spatial dependence;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health

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