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Inequality and Debt in a Model with Heterogeneous Agents

  • Federico Ravenna
  • Nicolas Vincent

We propose a DSGE model with income heterogeneity to help discriminate across competing explanations of the cross-sectional divergence in debt-to-income ratios in US data. We show that for a DSGE model to be consistent with the data, the divergence in income growth should not be anticipated and should happen in an economy with low cost of access to financial intermediation. Differential productivity growth across the top and bottom-income quantile of the population has a much smaller impact on debt accumulation by the bottom income-quantile relative to a cross-sectional tax reallocation.

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File URL: http://www.cirpee.org/fileadmin/documents/Cahiers_2014/CIRPEE14-08.pdf
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Paper provided by CIRPEE in its series Cahiers de recherche with number 1408.

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Date of creation: 2014
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Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:1408
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  1. Matteo Iacoviello, 2006. "Household Debt and Income Inequality, 1963-2003," 2006 Meeting Papers 585, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Andreas Hornstein & Per Krussell & Giovanni L. Violante, 2004. "The effects of technical change on labor market inequalities," Working Paper 04-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  3. Orazio Attanasio & Erik Hurst & Luigi Pistaferri, 2012. "The Evolution of Income, Consumption, and Leisure Inequality in The US, 1980-2010," NBER Working Papers 17982, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Mark A. Aguiar & Mark Bils, 2011. "Has Consumption Inequality Mirrored Income Inequality?," NBER Working Papers 16807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Michael Kumhof & Romain Rancière & Pablo Winant, 2015. "Inequality, Leverage, and Crises," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(3), pages 1217-45, March.
  6. Dirk Krueger & Fabrizio Perri, 2006. "Does Income Inequality Lead to Consumption Inequality? Evidence and Theory -super-1," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 163-193.
  7. Thomas Lemieux, 2006. "Increasing Residual Wage Inequality: Composition Effects, Noisy Data, or Rising Demand for Skill?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 461-498, June.
  8. repec:cbo:report:42729 is not listed on IDEAS
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